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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Burlington in Alamance County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Alamance Monument

 
 
Battle of Alamance Monument image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
1. Battle of Alamance Monument
Viewing south towards marker.
Inscription.  Alamance County citizens took the first steps to mark the site of the Battle of Alamance in 1879. On July 4, Rev. D. A. Long delivered a speech here, urging area residents to form an association with the charge of erecting a monument. Less than a year later, on May 29, 1880, the challenge came to fruition. Following a three-mile procession from the Alamance County Courthouse in Graham, a crowd of 3,000 to 4,000 viewed the unveiling of the marker.

The inscription on the monument refers to the Battle of Alamance as the "first battle of the American Revolution." Such a statement indicates the importance to the community of placing one of its most significant events in a broader and national historic context, even though many of the Regulators actually remained loyal to Great Britain during the Revolution.

The monument, constructed of granite from a county quarry, remained at the corner of modern day NC. Highway and Clapp Mill road until it was moved to its current location around 1952. Alamance Battlefield officially opened as a state historic site on May 16, 1961 marking the 190th anniversary of the Battle of Alamance.

(captions)

Grace
Battle of Alamance Monument image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
2. Battle of Alamance Monument
Viewing south towards marker.
Thompson of Alamance County visiting the monument in 1932.

Members of the North Carolina National Guard attempted to portray Governor Tryon's militia at the 1880 monument during Alamance County's Centennial Celebration in 1949.

Background: This plat was drawn by an Alamance County surveyor in 1926, showing the original parcel purchased for the monument.

Organizers presented this Regulator Bell, supposedly used by the Regulators at the Battle of Alamance, to Reverend Long at the monument's dedication. They referred to it as "the first Liberty Bell in America." It would later be exhibited at the Tennessee Centennial in 1896 and the Jamestown Exposition in 1907. The bell is now at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh.

The monument in the early 1900s.

Workers reinstalling the monument at its current location in the 1950s.

This June 2, 1880, Alamance Gleaner article describes the festivities surrounding the monument dedication.

This display was made possible by the Alamance Battlefield Friends and the Alamance Long Rifles.
 
Erected by The Alamance Battlefield Friends and the Alamance Long Rifles.
 
Location. 36° 0.513′ N, 79° 31.252′ W. Marker is in Burlington, North
Five of the markers and monuments in the immediate area. image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
3. Five of the markers and monuments in the immediate area.
Viewing south towards markers and monuments.
Carolina, in Alamance County. Marker is on State Highway 62 0.1 miles east of Clapp Mill Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5803 NC-62 S, Burlington NC 27215, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Alamance (here, next to this marker); First Battle of the Revolution (within shouting distance of this marker); Pugh's Rock (within shouting distance of this marker); Governor Tryon and the Militia (within shouting distance of this marker); Colonial Column (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Battle of Alamance (about 300 feet away); The Battle of the Alamance (about 300 feet away); The Regulators' Field (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burlington.
 
Also see . . .  . (Submitted on September 18, 2019.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
First Battle of the American Revolution monument image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
4. First Battle of the American Revolution monument
Viewing north towards monument.

Inscription:
First Battle of the Revolution
First Battle of the American Revolution monument image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
5. First Battle of the American Revolution monument
Viewing west towards monument.
The inscription of "1880" refers to the year of the monument's dedication.
First Battle of the American Revolution monument image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
6. First Battle of the American Revolution monument
Viewing south towards the monument.

Inscription:
Here was fought the Battle of Alamance.
May 16, 1771
Between the British and the Regulators
 

More. Search the internet for Battle of Alamance Monument.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 18, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 18, 2019. This page has been viewed 39 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 18, 2019. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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