Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Occoquan in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Historic Occoquan

The Mill House Museum, Yesterday and Today

 
 
Historic Occoquan Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Lassman, June 4, 2019
1. Historic Occoquan Marker
Viewing north towards the marker.
Note: To the right of the marker are large metal gears and just beyond is the the marker called "Historic Occoquan - Center for the Processing of Grain".
Inscription.  The Occoquan Merchants Mill was purchased in 1788 by Lighthorse Harry Lee, father of Robert E. Lee. By 1791 it had been rebuilt by Thomas Ellicott using the patented design of Ellicott's cousin, Oliver Evans. Letters dated that year indicated that George Washington had shown interest in the automated design for his own mill. The Occoquan Mill was eventually sold to Nathaniel Ellicott, brother of Thomas Ellicott. Insurance purchased in 1796 by Nathaniel Ellicott documented the mill as being 45 feet wide and 75 feet long from the street to the river. The mill was then sold to the Janney family, who owned it for more than 100 years. The miller's office, which was adjacent to the mill, is the only building left of the original mill structures and is now the home of the Mill House Museum. The photograph below show the relationship in size and placement of the mill and the museum structure on the riverbank.

(captions)
Pictures of Occoquan and the mill dating from the late 19th century show the miller's office which is the building we now use as the Mill House Museum.

19th century mill office and today the Mill House
Historic Occoquan Marker image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, June 4, 2019
2. Historic Occoquan Marker
Viewing north towards the marker.
Note: To the right of the marker are large metal gears and just beyond is the the marker called "Historic Occoquan - Center for the Processing of Grain".
Museum.

Given in memory of Walter D. Bailey, Historian and Educator, by his family.
 
Location. 38° 41.139′ N, 77° 15.733′ W. Marker is in Occoquan, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker can be reached from Mill Street 0.1 miles west of Ellicott Street, on the right when traveling west. Located on the west side of the Mill House Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 413 Mill Street, Occoquan VA 22125, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Town of Occoquan (here, next to this marker); Gearwheel Assembly (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Historic Occoquan (here, next to this marker); Occoquan (a few steps from this marker); Ellicott’s Mill (a few steps from this marker); The Dogue Indians (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Historic Occoquan (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Carbide Bunker (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Occoquan.
 
Also see . . .  Mill House Museum. Town of Occoquan (Submitted on September 21, 2019.) 
 
Categories. ArchitectureColonial EraIndustry & CommercePatriots & Patriotism
 
Mill House Museum exterior image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, June 4, 2019
3. Mill House Museum exterior
Viewing east towards the museum.
Occoquan River image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, June 4, 2019
4. Occoquan River
Viewing east from the footbridge over the Occocquan River, which is located about 100 feet west of the marker.
 

More. Search the internet for Historic Occoquan.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 23, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 21, 2019. This page has been viewed 51 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 21, 2019. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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