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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Carter Farm

Death of Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne

 
 
The Carter Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
1. The Carter Farm Marker
Inscription.  

Just before sundown on November 30, 1864, 3,000 Confederate soldiers charged past here and smashed into the main Federal line fewer than 200 feet ahead of you. They belonged to Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne’s Division, the most battle-hardened unit of the Army of Tennessee. Beginning in 1862 with the Battle of Shiloh, Cleburne’s Division fought in most major battles in the Western Theater, including Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and Atlanta.

Cleburne’s brigade commanders—Gens. Hiram G. Granbury, Mark P. Lowrey, and Daniel C. Govan—were disciplined combat leaders. At Franklin they initially led their men toward Union Col. Joseph Conrad’s brigade, which was part of an advanced Federal position. Conrad’s men resisted but then fell back toward the main line with Cleburne’s Division in rapid pursuit. Cleburne saw that the moment as the best opportunity to break the main line and he quickly advanced on horseback with his men. His horse was shot beneath him, and as he mounted another it was also killed. He then advanced on foot, his sword held aloft as he encouraged his men to push ahead in the face of withering Union
The Cleburne death site image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
2. The Cleburne death site
The cotton gin and angle markers are visible across the road.
fire. Then a single bullet tore into Cleburne’s chest and he fell near this spot and died almost instantly. His men plunged into the teeth of the Federal position and momentarily broke through. Their success was short-lived, however.

After the battle, Cleburne was buried south of Columbia, Tennessee, at St. John’s Episcopal Church. In 1869, his body was reinterred at his pre-war residence, Helena, Arkansas.
 
Erected by Historic Franklin Parks.
 
Location. 35° 54.914′ N, 86° 52.368′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Cleburne Street and Fristoe Lane, on the right when traveling east. Located in the Assault on the Cotton Gin Historic Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1259 Columbia Avenue, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Carter Farm (a few steps from this marker); Carter Gin House (within shouting distance of this marker); Carter's Cotton Gin (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing. ); The Cotton Gin Assault (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing. ); a different marker also named The Carter Farm
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
3. Inset
Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
4. Inset
Cleburne’s brigade commanders: Gen. Hiram G. Granbury (KIA), Gen. Mark P. Lowrey (ca. 1870s photo), Gen. Daniel C. Govan
The Cleburne monument & gravesite, Helena AK image. Click for full size.
From Brainbendings.blogspot.com
5. The Cleburne monument & gravesite, Helena AK
The Cleburne Memorial at the battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
6. The Cleburne Memorial at the battlefield
 

More. Search the internet for The Carter Farm.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 28, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 28, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 47 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 28, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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