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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Florence in Lauderdale County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Tate Springs Estate Early 1800ís

 
 
Tate Springs Estate Early 1800ís Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, October 29, 2019
1. Tate Springs Estate Early 1800ís Marker
Inscription.  Known for its mineral springs and prominent grist mill, this estate was part of the large reserve set aside by the 1798 Tellico Treaty for Cherokee Indian Chief Doublehead. John Reuben Hough was an early settler of Major Donelsonís party and according to local understanding, John B. Hough married Ophelia, daughter of Chief Doublehead. Their daughter, Eliza (Elizabeth) Hough married John S. Tate. They built their early home at this site in 1818 surrounded by approximately 3,400 acres. This site is also the origination of Hough road which runs west into Florence. Tate Springs Estate has remained in the Tate family, descendants of Chief Doublehead, through the Lake E. Tate family.
 
Erected by Erected by John L. Tate & Family.
 
Location. 34° 51.904′ N, 87° 35.153′ W. Marker is in Florence, Alabama, in Lauderdale County. Marker is on Bennett Road (County Road 27) north of County Road 22, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1436-1490 Co Rd 27, Florence AL 35630, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured
Tate Springs Estate Early 1800ís Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, October 29, 2019
2. Tate Springs Estate Early 1800ís Marker
as the crow flies. St. Florian Historic District (approx. 2.2 miles away); St. Michael's Catholic Church (approx. 2.4 miles away); Muscle Shoals Canal (approx. 2Ĺ miles away); Town of Killen (approx. 2.6 miles away); Wilson Family Cemetery 19th Century / Slave Cemetery 19th Century (approx. 2.7 miles away); Killen and the Canal System (approx. 3.1 miles away); Shoals Creek Preserve Tract (approx. 3.4 miles away); Andrew Jackson's Military Road (approx. 3.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Florence.
 
Also see . . .
1. Treaty of Tellico. This treaty served as an addendum to the Treaty of Holston and was the only treaty between the United States and Native Americans executed during the administration of President John Adams. The treaty was signed by Thomas Butler and George Walton, commissioners of the United States, and some thirty-nine Cherokee chiefs and warriors, in the presence of Silas Dinsmoor, Agent of the United States among the Cherokee, and thirteen other witnesses including Charles R. Hicks, who served as interpreter. (Submitted on October 30, 2019, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Alabama, USA.) 

2. Chief Doublehead. Doublehead (1744–1807) or Incalatanga (Tal-tsu'tsa in Cherokee), was one of the most feared warriors of the Cherokee during the Cherokee–American
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wars. In 1788, his brother, Old Tassel, was chief of the Cherokee people, but was killed under a truce (negotiating peace) by frontier rangers. In 1791 Doublehead was among a delegation of Cherokees who visited U.S. President George Washington in Philadelphia. After the peace treaty at the Tellico Blockhouse in 1794, Doublehead served as one of the leaders of the Chickamauga Cherokee (or "Lower Cherokee"). Upon the death of his nephew, Principal Chief John Watts, in 1802, Doublehead was chosen as leader of the Chickamauga (taking on the title Chuqualataque) (Submitted on October 30, 2019, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Alabama, USA.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on November 6, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 30, 2019, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Alabama, USA. This page has been viewed 51 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 30, 2019, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Alabama, USA. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.
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