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Near Fort Hunter in Montgomery County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Schoharie Aqueduct

Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site

 
 
The Schoharie Aqueduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, November 2, 2019
1. The Schoharie Aqueduct Marker
Inscription.  
The stone structure extending about halfway across Schoharie Creek in front of you is what remains of the Schoharie Aqueduct. Built between 1839 and 1841 as part of the Enlarged Erie Canal, the Schoharie Aqueduct was perhaps the single greatest improvement made during the canal's enlargement phase. The 14-arch, 624-foot-long aqueduct carried the Enlarged Erie above, and totally apart from, the Schoharie Creek.

Because the original 1820s Erie Canal entered the creek itself, whenever the Schoharie was flooded, traffic on the canal was often halted for days. After the aqueduct went into operation, canal traffic no longer had to be interrupted.

The aqueduct was abandoned in 1917, when the Barge Canal opened in the Mohawk River. A series of arches at the east end were removed to prevent ice jams. Other arches have collapsed
 
Location. 42° 56.364′ N, 74° 17.374′ W. Marker is near Fort Hunter, New York, in Montgomery County. Marker is on Dufel Road 0.4 miles west of New York State Route 5S, on the right when traveling west. Dufel Road ends at
The Schoharie Aqueduct Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, November 2, 2019
2. The Schoharie Aqueduct Marker Detail
"Mules towing a barge east across Schoharie Aqueduct, ca. 1890. Courtesy of the Fort Hunter Canal Society."
the boat launch parking area which is adjacent to, and immediately south of the Schoharie Creek. The marker is in the grassy area between the creek and the parking area. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Hunter NY 12069, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lock 30 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Schoharie Crossing (approx. 0.3 miles away); Once A Farm (approx. 0.4 miles away); In the Wake of Hurricane Irene (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Fort by the Village (approx. 0.4 miles away); Building Block of the Erie Canal (approx. 0.4 miles away); Site of Queen Anne Chapel (approx. 0.4 miles away); Site of First Bridge (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Hunter.
 
Also see . . .
1. Preservation League of NYS; Seven to Save: 2018-19 Edition. (Submitted on November 5, 2019, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
2. Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site - The Schoharie Creek Aqueduct. From the website, "ErieCanal.org" (Submitted on November 5, 2019, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.) 

3. Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site. (Submitted on November 5, 2019, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Additional keywords. Seven To Save
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesWaterways & Vessels
 
The Schoharie Aqueduct Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, November 2, 2019
3. The Schoharie Aqueduct Marker Detail
"Aqueduct facing southeast, ca. 1900. The Schoharie Aqueduct was built by Schenectady contractor Otis Eddy at a cost of $180,000. Courtesy of the Fort Hunter Canal Society. "
The Schoharie Aqueduct Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, November 2, 2019
4. The Schoharie Aqueduct Marker
The Schoharie Aqueduct & Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, November 2, 2019
5. The Schoharie Aqueduct & Marker
With the marker in the foreground, the remaining sections of the Schoharie Aqueduct, including the six remaining arches, can be seen in the background.
The Schoharie Aqueduct image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, July 5, 2006
6. The Schoharie Aqueduct
 

More. Search the internet for The Schoharie Aqueduct.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 22, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 5, 2019, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 41 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 5, 2019, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.
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