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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Fort Granger

“We could see every troop and every gun”

 
 
Fort Granger Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
1. Fort Granger Marker
Inscription.  Union troops fought at Fort Granger during the Battle of Franklin of November 30, 1864. As the sun set that afternoon, Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood’s army engaged Union Gen. John M. Schofield’s troops in a vicious battle. Five horrific hours of terrible fighting, which included extensive hand-to-hand combat and artillery fire, resulted in roughly 10,000 casualties.

Situated at this vantage point during the battle, Schofield had a commanding view of the battlefield. Simultaneously, he monitored the building of pontoon bridges across the Harpeth River that allowed him to move troops and supply wagons to Nashville once the battle was over.

Secure behind the fort’s walls, Capt. Glen J. Cockrill’s three-inch rifled guns of Battery D, 1st Ohio Light Artillery, delivered crippling blows to the advancing Confederates. German immigrant and Union Lt. Frederick W. Fout later wrote, “From our post at Fort Granger, we could see every troop and every gun in our line, as long as it was day and the cloud of gun smoke allowed it. After sundown, the sparks of rifle fire and the lightning, thunder and groaning of the heavy cannons
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, November 4, 2019
2. Inset
In this highly-stylized lithograph of the Battle of Franklin, the guns of Fort Granger fire from the upper left.
was splendid and awe-inspiring for the eye and ear.”

As the guns inside Fort Granger rained heavy fire on Confederate Gen. A.P. Stewart’s advancing line, his right flank was pinned by the Harpeth River. Confederate infantry regiments including the 35th Alabama and 12th Louisiana, Gen. Thomas Scott’s Brigade, and the 43rd Mississippi, Gen. John Adams’s brigade, suffered particularly heavy losses. Altogether Stewart’s Corps suffered nearly 3,000 casualties during the battle, many of which were inflicted by the fire from Fort Granger.

"The enemy made a heavy and persistent attack with about two corps, commencing at 4 P.M. and lasting until after dark. He was repulsed ... with very heavy loss, probably 5000 or 6000 men ... We have captured about 1,000 men, including one brigadier general."
—Gen. John Schofield, November 30, 1864
 
Erected by Historic Franklin Parks.
 
Location. 35° 55.481′ N, 86° 51.603′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Edy Lane south of Fort Granger Drive, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Fort Granger Park, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Fort Granger (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner
3. Inset
Major General John M. Schofield
line); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Granger (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Fort Granger (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
4. Inset
General A.P. Stewart
3" Ordinance Rifle image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, May 22, 2017
5. 3" Ordinance Rifle
No fieldpieces are on display at the fort. This one is on the grounds of the Carter House.
The View From Figuer's Bluff image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 2007
6. The View From Figuer's Bluff
The current marker replaced this battlefield overview.
 

More. Search the internet for Fort Granger.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 13, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 12, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 44 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 12, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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