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Atlanta in Fulton County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Clement Hoffman Stevens

"A Man of Many Talents and Great Accomplishment"

 
 
Clement Hoffman Stevens Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 10, 2019
1. Clement Hoffman Stevens Marker
Inscription.  One mile south from this point, near the current corner of Wycliff Road and 28th Street, a gallant Confederate soldier known to his men as the “Rock” was mortally wounded by an artillery round while leading an assault against entrenched Federal infantry.

Brigadier General Clement Hoffman Stevens of South Carolina was a man of many talents and great accomplishment. Born August 14, 1821 in Norwich, Connecticut, Stevens moved to Pendleton, South Carolina, working for the U.S. Navy, and as a cashier at the Planters and Mechanics Bank in Charleston. When South Carolina withdrew from the United States on December 20, 1860 he was a member of a railroad construction firm and quickly offered his service in defense of his adopted state.

Always an innovator, Stevens created an “Iron Battery,” credited by many historians as the prototype for the CSS Virginia and an early version of this invention was used in the bombardment of Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861. Another of his inventions was a portable oven, making it possible to bake bread for troops while in the field.

At the First Battle of Manassas,

Clement Hoffman Stevens Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 10, 2019
2. Clement Hoffman Stevens Marker
July 21, 1861, Stevens served as an Aide-de-Camp to his brother-in-law Brigadier General Barnard Bee and was severely wounded on the field. Returning to Charleston to recuperate, he raised the 24th Regiment, South Carolina Volunteer Infantry and served as its Colonel. In that capacity he saw action at the Battle of Seccessionville. On May 3, 1863, his regiment was attached to the South Carolina brigade of Brigadier General States Rights Gist and following the Vicksburg Campaign; the brigade was transferred to the Army of Tennessee. During the second day of the Battle of Chickamauga, September 20, 1863, Stevens was severely wounded after he had two horses killed beneath him while leading his regiment, a display Gist referred to as “iron-nerved”. For his "gallantry on the field and... his devotion to the cause,” Stevens was promoted to Brigadier General on January 20, 1864 and given command of a Georgia brigade composed of units of the 1st, 25th, 29th, 30th and 66th Georgia Infantry Regiments and the 1st Georgia Sharpshooters, serving admirably in Lt. General William J. Hardee's Corps, Walker's Division during the entire Atlanta Campaign. When General Joseph E. Johnston was removed from command on July 18, 1864 by Confederate President Jefferson Davis, Stevens immediately wrote to Johnston expressing his displeasure: “The announcement that you are
Clement Hoffman Stevens Marker on left. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 10, 2019
3. Clement Hoffman Stevens Marker on left.
no longer to be our leader was received by officers and men in silence and deep sorrow... We would hail with joy your return to command us.”

July 20, 1864, during the Battle of Peachtree Creek, General Clement Hoffman Stevens led his Georgia Brigade against Federal lines and received his mortal wound. Stevens's life would linger five days until he died in Atlanta on July 25, 1864. General Braxton Bragg called his death “a serious loss.” His body was reverently taken back to Pendleton, South Carolina and there buried next to General Bee in St. Paul's Episcopal Church Cemetery.
 
Erected by the Georgia Civil War Commission & Sons of Confederate Veterans.
 
Location. 33° 49.07′ N, 84° 23.331′ W. Marker is in Atlanta, Georgia, in Fulton County. Marker is at the intersection of Fairhaven Circle NE and Peachtree Road (U.S. 19), on the right when traveling east on Fairhaven Circle NE. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Fairhaven Circle NE, Atlanta GA 30305, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Peach Tree Creek Crossing (here, next to this marker); Wood's & Newton's Divs. at Peachtree Creek (here, next to this marker); Ward's Div. Crossed Peachtree Creek (here, next to this marker); Ward’s Div. Deployed

Clement Hoffman Stevens (August 14, 1821 – July 25, 1864) image. Click for full size.
By Pd Us
4. Clement Hoffman Stevens (August 14, 1821 – July 25, 1864)
(approx. half a mile away); King's Brigade (approx. 0.7 miles away); Newton’s Division (approx. 0.7 miles away); Hardee at Peachtree Creek (approx. 0.7 miles away); The Mississippi Brigade (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Atlanta.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia article on Clement Hoffman Stevens. (Submitted on November 12, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 

More. Search the internet for Clement Hoffman Stevens.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 12, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 12, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 40 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 12, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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