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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Fort Granger

“Tried in the Fire”

 
 
Fort Granger "Tried in the Fire" marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
1. Fort Granger "Tried in the Fire" marker
Inscription.  Staunchly pro-Confederate Williamson County raised several large regiments in the spring of 1861. But after the fall of Nashville in February 1862, Federal regiments quickly occupied the region. They suppressed hostile Confederate sympathizers and seized buildings for hospitals, barracks, and supply deports. Local Confederate supporter Mary Pearre wrote,” A Federal force is at Franklin. Cavalry are scouting all over the country, stealing money, clothes, foraging, pressing horses and capturing ‘Secesh’ soldiers.” Troops sometimes commandeered slaves to help build fortifications, including Fort Granger.

By February 12, 1863, the first Federal regiment arrived to construct Fort Granger. Led by Col. Emerson Opdycke, the 125th Ohio Volunteer Infantry soon found supporters among the county’s quiet Unionist population, including Franklin native Dr. Daniel B. Cliffe and his wife.

Emboldened by the Federal army’s protection, local Unionists held a rally for Union and Restoration in Franklin at the courthouse.

”The speakers included William Parsons Brownlow, Governor Andrew Johnson, Judge John S. Brien,
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
2. Inset
Col. Emerson Opdyke
and U.S. Col. L.G. Houck… Our Union friends in Williamson, who have been tried in the fire, are greatly encouraged and feel hopeful. …After the speaking was over … Maj. Fitzgibbon, of the 14th Michigan, so deservingly popular with our citizens, captured us and carried us off to his delightful quarters at Fort Granger where we were served enough rations of excellent food. … In company with a large delegation from this place, escorted by General Granger, we visited Fort Granger, one of the strongest and finest fortifications in the department (sic) of the Cumberland. … General Granger gave the company an exhibition of his skill in gunning by firing two splendid shots from a monster Parrott gun, at a target over a mile distant.”
The Nashville Daily Union, August 22, 1863
— Courtesy Tennessee State Library & Archives
 
Erected by Historic Franklin Parks.
 
Location. 35° 55.542′ N, 86° 51.644′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Eddy Lane near Fort Granger Drive, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Fort Granger Park, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Fort Granger (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Fort Granger
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
3. Inset
Daniel B. Cliffe
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Granger (about 600 feet away); Franklin Cotton Factory and Foundry / Lillie Mills (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Fort Granger (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesGovernment & PoliticsWar, US Civil
 
Fort Granger Interior image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 18, 2019
4. Fort Granger Interior
The marker is along the path to the right of the bench at the north end of the grounds.
 

More. Search the internet for Fort Granger.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 17, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 16, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 56 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 16, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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