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Port Tobacco in Charles County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Port Tobacco: A Maryland Mosaic

 
 
Port Tobacco: A Maryland Mosaic Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 23, 2019
1. Port Tobacco: A Maryland Mosaic Marker
Inscription.  On this ground, two cultures — Indian and European — confronted one another. Here a commercial town and government center grew, declined, grew again, and declined again. Residents raised supplies for the Continental Army and, during the depression after the American Revolution, closed the courts to prevent foreclosures. A great US President's kidnapping was plotted, a scheme that ended in his murder. Twenty years earlier two free Africans were tried and convicted in the courthouse for leading a peaceful slave insurrection. This is Port Tobacco.

Potobac, one of the ancestral groups of today's Piscataway Indians and other native groups, had a village in this area in the 1600s. By the end of that century or early in the next Europeans built a scatter of houses and warehouses called Chandler's Town. Renamed Charles Town in 1727, but known locally throughout its history as Port Tobacco, the town became, and remained, the seat of Charles County government until 1896.

The only surviving map of the town dates to 1888,
Port Tobacco: A Maryland Mosaic Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 23, 2019
2. Port Tobacco: A Maryland Mosaic Marker
200 years after initial European settlement. Over those years the town's inhabitants and neighbors shared in the nation's major experiences:
contact and conflicts with Native Americans;
the Revolutionary War;
religious diversity;
slavery;
the Civil War; and
segregation, to name a few.

The people of Port Tobacco helped forge the nation's character. Current research examines those people and the nation they helped create.

The Port Tobacco Archaeological Project was created in 2007 to research the 300-year-old town and its aboriginal predecessors.

Tens of thousands of artifacts have been unearthed to date, many dating to the years before the American Revolution of 1776 to 1783. Scientists study those objects to learn about the beliefs and customs of the area's inhabitants, and to illuminate a complex history that has shaped our present.
 
Erected by Maryland Heritage Area Authority.
 
Location. 38° 30.676′ N, 77° 1.195′ W. Marker is in Port Tobacco, Maryland, in Charles County. Marker is on Commerce Street 0.1 miles west of Chapel Point Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8430 Commerce St, Port Tobacco MD 20677, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within
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walking distance of this marker. On to Yorktown (here, next to this marker); Port Tobacco (a few steps from this marker); John Wilkes Booth (a few steps from this marker); Port Tobacco: Commerce (a few steps from this marker); Port Tobacco: Conspiracy & the Plot to Assassinate President Lincoln (a few steps from this marker); St. Columba Masonic Lodge (within shouting distance of this marker); The Port Tobacco Jail (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Port Tobacco (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Port Tobacco.
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansAnthropology & ArchaeologyChurches & ReligionCivil RightsColonial EraIndustry & CommerceNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, US CivilWar, US Revolutionary
 

More. Search the internet for Port Tobacco: A Maryland Mosaic.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 23, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 23, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 49 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 23, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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