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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Carnton

Slavery and the Enslaved

 
 
Carnton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
1. Carnton Marker
Inscription.  The first enslaved African Americans were brought to Carnton in the nineteenth century. In 1820, eleven slaves lived here. By 1860, forty-four enslaved men, women and children labored on the six-hundred-acre farm. They lived in eleven cabins, most of them wooden, located two or three hundred yards south of the manor house. Only this brick dwelling survives. It was likely the home of skilled laborers or the slaves who worker in and around the house.

A young man named Gabriel was one of the slaves here. He and his parents, Jacob and Judy, were owned by Van Winder, of Ducros Plantation in Louisiana. In 1853, Van Winder brought Gabriel to Tennessee and gave him to his daughter Carrie McGavock. Gabriel lived at Carnton until his tragic death in 1859 while riding a mule.

Madison, another slave, was owned by Randal McGavock and later by his wife Sarah, who bequeathed Madison to her daughter, Mary. During the war, he was sent to Mississippi, where he escaped and became a cook for the 58th Illinois Infantry. He later lived in Memphis, where he died in 1879.

In 1860, 25 percent of white Tennessee families—or more
Carnton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
2. Carnton Marker
The brick slave quarters
than 149,000 families—owned at least one slave. Slaves comprised half of Williamson County’s population, more than 12,000 out of 22,000. There were 3.9 million slaves in the United States then, and the contentious debate over slavery and its expansion plunged the country into a vicious war that cos the lives of about 650,000 Americans.
 
Erected by Battle of Franklin Trust.
 
Location. 35° 54.183′ N, 86° 51.459′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Eastern Flank Circle 0.4 miles south of Lewsiburg Pike (Business U.S. 431), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1345 Eastern Flank Circle, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Carnton Plantation (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported permanently removed. ); Civil War Franklin (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Civil War Franklin (about 400 feet away); The McGavock Garden (about 400 feet away); Maj. Gen. William W. Loring's Division (about 500 feet away); McGavock Family Cemetery (about 700 feet away); The Final Campaign 1864 (about 800 feet away); The Battle of Franklin (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Also see . . .
Insert image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
3. Insert
Two young escaped slaves
 The Battle of Franklin Trust. (Submitted on November 23, 2019.)
 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
4. Inset
“Lincoln’s Last Warning” threatening to destroy slavery if the South does not surrender. Harper’s Weekly, Oct.11, 1862
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
5. Inset
Plantation street with slave cabins, ca. 1860
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
6. Inset
Army cook at work
 

More. Search the internet for Carnton.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 25, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 22, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 51 times since then and 10 times this year. Last updated on November 25, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 22, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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