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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Carnton

A Final Place of Rest

 
 
Carnton - A Final Place of Rest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
1. Carnton - A Final Place of Rest Marker
Inscription.  In this part of the McGavock family cemetery are buried some of the people who were once enslaved here, former slaves, and perhaps African-Americans who labored at Carnton in the decades following the Civil War. These individuals are an integrated part of the site’s history and they, in large part, made Carnton what it became in the 19th century: a large and successful farm. While they were interred near the McGavock family section, the line of delineation between the two is obvious yet today.

The only marked graves in the African American section are those of Mariah and Bolen Reddick’s twin sons, who were stillborn in 1877. Mariah Reddick had once been a McGavock slave. She lived until 1922 and is buried next to her husband at Toussaint L’Ouverture Cemetery in downtown Franklin.

Formal family cemeteries such as this were far from typical. Most people in the 18th and 19th centuries, whatever their race or background, were buried in crude graves with wooden markers and thus were lost to time.

Today this cemetery is a place of rest, but it is also a place for the living to remember. While those buried here are largely
The McGavock Family Cemetery grounds image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
2. The McGavock Family Cemetery grounds
unknown, the story of their lives, their hardships, their perseverance, and their legacy is forever part of the story of Carnton. Some of those buried here may have finally witnessed the day when freedom came, although equality remained a distant dream.
 
Erected by Battle of Franklin Trust.
 
Location. 35° 54.267′ N, 86° 51.578′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Eastern Flank Circle 0.4 miles south of Lewisburg Pike (Business U.S. 431), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1345 Eastern Flank Cir, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. McGavock Family Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); McGavock Confederate Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); Maj. Gen. William W. Loring's Division (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 300 feet away); The Final Campaign 1864 (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Franklin (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Categories.
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
3. Inset
Mary Brice, an enslaved woman, ca. 1853
African AmericansCemeteries & Burial Sites
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
4. Inset
African American family on former plantation, ca. 1907
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
5. Inset
Although this image illustrates hasty burials in a military cemetery, family cemeteries were often similar. Slave cemeteries typically lacked headboards; simple fieldstones marked the graves, as here at Carnton.
 

More. Search the internet for Carnton.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 26, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 26, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 47 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 26, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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