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Chickamauga in Walker County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Medal of Honor Heritage Trail

Chickamauga - September - 1863

 
 
Medal of Honor Heritage Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 20, 2019
1. Medal of Honor Heritage Trail Marker
Inscription.  Captain Horace Porter was Chief of Ordnance for the , Army of the Cumberland. During the Battle of Chickamauga Porter served as a volunteer aide to General Rosecrans. During the Confederate breakthrough on September 20 Rosecrans yelled, “If you care to live any longer,” “get away from here.” Captain Porter rallied retreating fugitives to form a mounted defense that through hard fighting saved the Army's wagon trains, an action for which he would be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor later. He received presidential appointment to several positions after the war. He served as U.S. Ambassador to France from 1897 to 1905, and while serving he located John Paul Jones' remains, which were subsequently brought back to the United States at his expense, where they rest today in the United States Naval Academy. He received the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honor from the French government in 1904.

Orville T. Chamberlain was a student at the University of Notre Dame in northwestern Indiana. Early in the war so many other students, including a few of the priest instructors, followed his example,

Medal of Honor Heritage Trail Marker is the second in from the right. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 20, 2019
2. Medal of Honor Heritage Trail Marker is the second in from the right.
that the school became known as the home of the Fighting Irish. On the second day of the battle at Chickamauga the fighting was so intense that ammunition became a problem. During this time Lieutenant Chamberlain, in spite of the galling fire from the Confederates, made his way through the woods and found another regiment that had plenty of ammunition. He brought the very badly needed ammunition back to his own company. For this action he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

When the war was over, a proud Notre Dame welcomed back several bona fide war heroes and became home to a unique veteran's organization: a Grand Army of the Republic post composed entirely of ordained priests or professed brothers.

Anthony Taylor responded to President Lincoln's call for volunteers early in the war and enlisted on August 22, 1861 as a Private in Company A of the 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry Regiment. He was promoted to First Sergeant on March 1, 1863 and to First Lieutenant on May 8, 1863 as the Army was preparing to move against the Confederates at Tullahoma. During the Battle of Chickamauga Lieutenant Taylor was in charge of the couriers at Rosecrans headquarters.

On September 20, while General Rosecrans and the senior officers made a rapid retreat toward Chattanooga, Lieutenant Taylor joined a group organized by Captain Horace

Horace Porter / Orville Chamberlain / Anthony Taylor image. Click for full size.
By Pd/cc By-sa 4.0/pd
3. Horace Porter / Orville Chamberlain / Anthony Taylor
Mathew Brady or Levin Handy (LOC) / CC BY-SA 4.0 / F . Gutekunst Photographers
Porter and fought a rear guard action against great odds, giving the Federal wagon train and artillery time to escape.

At the end of the war, it was Anthony Taylor who carried the dispatch from General Palmer that led to the capture of Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy.

He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, issued on December 4, 1893, for his heroic action in the second day of fighting at Chickamauga. His citation reads: “Held out to the last with a small force against the advance of superior numbers of the enemy."
 
Erected by the D.A. and I.H. Jewell Memorial Foundation, the National Medal of Honor Foundation.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients marker series.
 
Location. 34° 53.007′ N, 85° 16.032′ W. Marker is in Chickamauga, Georgia, in Walker County. Marker is on Lee Gordan Mill Terrace east of Red Belt Road, on the left when traveling east. Located at the Lee & Gordon's Mills. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 71 Red Belt Road, Chickamauga GA 30707, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Medal of Honor Heritage Trail (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Medal of Honor Heritage Trail (here, next to this

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marker); Start of the Atlanta Campaign (here, next to this marker); General Joe Wheeler's Attack (here, next to this marker); Crittenden's Corps at Lee and Gordon's Mills (here, next to this marker); Lee & Gordon's Mills (within shouting distance of this marker); Lee and Gordon's Mill (within shouting distance of this marker); 3rd Confederate Georgia Cavalry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chickamauga.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia article on Captain Horace Porter. (Submitted on November 27, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
2. Wikipedia article on Orville T. Chamberlain. (Submitted on November 27, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
3. Wikipedia article on Anthony Taylor. (Submitted on November 27, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. HeroesWar, US Civil
 

More. Search the internet for Medal of Honor Heritage Trail.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 27, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 40 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 27, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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