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Chickamauga in Walker County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Medal of Honor Heritage Trail

Chickamauga - September - 1863

 
 
Medal of Honor Heritage Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 20, 2019
1. Medal of Honor Heritage Trail Marker
Inscription.  At the start of the American Civil War William E. Richey enlisted in Company A of the 15" Ohio Infantry Regiment. He was a corporal when he came to north Georgia in September 1863.

In his report of the battle, Lieutenant Colonel Frank Askew, Richey's regimental commander stated“...as soon as the men got their breakfasts and as soon as the pickets could be drawn in and after a very rapid march [we) came up with the brigade several miles south of Crawfish Springs ... We moved in the rear of the brigade, the battery being before us, until we reached the place where the brigade went into action. We formed the second line in rear of the Forty-ninth Ohio.

“During the afternoon, when the Confederates made their attack they were so close to the Federal lines that Corporal Richey found himself between the lines of combatants. Acting quickly, he single-handedly captured a Confederate major, who was armed and mounted. By taking the charging enemy's commanding officer, Corporal Richey denied the attacking Confederate forces of leadership.

Corporal William Richey was later awarded the Medal of

Medal of Honor Heritage Trail Marker is on far right of six. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 20, 2019
2. Medal of Honor Heritage Trail Marker is on far right of six.
Honor for his capture of the Confederate major on September 19, 1863. His citation stated: “While on the extreme front, between the lines of the combatants, single-handed he captured a Confederate major who was armed and mounted.”

George S. Myers was an Ohio man who enlisted early in the war, joining the 101st Ohio Infantry Regiment as a Private. This regiment came to north Georgia as a part of William P. Carlin's 2nd Brigade in General Jefferson C Davis's 1st Division of the 20h Army Corps in General Rosecrans’ Army of the Cumberland. The unit participated in the battle of Chickamauga where it re-captured a battery, fighting over the guns with clubbed muskets.

Captain Leonard D. Smith, who had assumed command of the 101" Ohio Infantry out of necessity during the battle, later wrote “On the morning of the 19" the 101" Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under command of Lieutenant Colonel Messer, moved with the balance of the brigade toward Crawfish Spring, near which the battle was already progressing. Between 1 and 2 p.m. The regiment left the pike, and after about a mile of moving at double-quick obeyed the order of “On left by file into line,” and were in line of battle in a corn-field and woods, while the movements of the enemy were concealed by heavy timber in our front. A few moments after 2 o'clock the regiment

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was ordered forward to the fence dividing the corn-field and woods. By this time the Thirty-eighth Illinois on our left had become engaged; also a Kentucky regiment of General Wood's division to our right, a portion of which covered the front of our right wing.

"Early on Sunday morning, September 20, we were moved to a position to the rear of the Chattanooga pike and opposite General Rosecrans' headquarters, on a high range of hills. At 8 o'clock we moved to the left and then forward in close column by division about 1 mile and then deployed, taking a position behind some logs which had been used as a breastwork. Skirmishers were thrown out, relieving those we found there, and the men ordered to lie down. While in this position, a regiment not belonging to this brigade moved up and lay down among our men, thus rendering the management of the regiment almost impossible.

Private George S. Myers would always be remembered by the veterans of the 101st Ohio for saving the regimental colors by great personal devotion and bravery and he was awarded the Medal of Honor for his act of valor. The 101st Ohio Infantry Regiment followed Sherman on the Atlanta campaign, participating in all the battles and marched with Thomas to Nashville, afterwards following Hood in his retreat. The regiment was mustered out June 12, 1865.

William G. Whitney

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enlisted in Company B, 11th Michigan Infantry Regiment at Quincy, Michigan. He was a Sergeant when he came to north Georgia in September, 1863. He took part in both days of fighting on September 19th and 20th at Chickamauga. During the second day's fighting, General Negley left the field. Colonel Stanley pushed forward with his brigade until he found General Thomas who ordered him to advance in support of General Beatty with the First Brigade. Beatty was struck by by a ball or piece of shell on the right shoulder and was unable to continue. He turned command over to Colonel Stroughton, of the 11th Michigan.

About 4 o'clock, the Confederates made a vigorous attack and the Federals found themselves confronted by heavy force, the enemy having planted their colors within 100 feet of their breastworks. It was then that Sergeant William G. Whitney took advantage of the thick smoke to crawl outside the position at great exposure to himself to retrieve ammunition, bringing it back to enable his men to keep up the fire.

After the war, Sergeant Whitney returned to Michigan and was later awarded the Medal of Honor for what he did on Snodgrass Hill that day in 1863. His citation stated: “As the enemy were about to charge, this officer went outside the temporary Federal works among the dead and wounded enemy and at great exposure to himself cut off and removed their cartridge boxes, bringing the same within the Federal lines, the ammunition being used with good effect in again repulsing the attack."
 
Erected by the National Medal of Honor Foundation.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients marker series.
 
Location. 34° 53.007′ N, 85° 16.031′ W. Marker is in Chickamauga, Georgia, in Walker County. Marker is on Lee Gordan Mill Terrace east of Red Belt Road, on the left when traveling east. Located at Lee & Gordon's Mills. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 71 Red Belt Road, Chickamauga GA 30707, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Medal of Honor Heritage Trail (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Medal of Honor Heritage Trail (here, next to this marker); Start of the Atlanta Campaign (here, next to this marker); General Joe Wheeler's Attack (here, next to this marker); Crittenden's Corps at Lee and Gordon's Mills (here, next to this marker); Lee & Gordon's Mills (within shouting distance of this marker); Lee and Gordon's Mill (within shouting distance of this marker); 3rd Confederate Georgia Cavalry (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chickamauga.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation on William E. Richey. (Submitted on November 27, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
2. The Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation on George S. Myers. (Submitted on November 27, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
3. Wikipedia article on William G. Whitney. (Submitted on November 27, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. HeroesWar, US Civil

 

More. Search the internet for Medal of Honor Heritage Trail.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 27, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 39 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 27, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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