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Manassas, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

War on the Landscape

1861

 
 
War on the Landscape Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 30, 2019
1. War on the Landscape Marker
Inscription.  In the early summer of 1861, preparations for war made Manassas Junction one of the most famous places on earth. The railway junction held great strategic significance for the Confederacy, and the new nation assembled its largest army to defend this place. The war effort resulted in the first major battle of the Civil War on July 21, 1861, five miles north of here.

The First Battle of Manassas ushered in a brutal, long war. After the battle, the Confederate army remained in the area for the winter, consuming woodlots, livestock, and crops. A local resident remembered, "There was enough firewood on our farm to last us for hundreds of years. But the Southern troops had their quarters here and cut down every bit of it." From Manassas Junction through Centreville to Fairfax, the Confederate army scarred the landscape with vast camps and fortifications.

[Aside:]
[Manassas] is the point of attraction for the whole South.... There must be fighting here, and [this] is the place, therefore, for meeting people, not unlike New York.
— Charleston [SC] Mercury, June 27, 1861


[Captions:]
This
War on the Landscape Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 30, 2019
2. War on the Landscape Marker
detail from a mid-nineteenth century map shows the Orange and Alexandria Railroad line intersecting with the Manassas Gap Railroad line. The strategic value of these two lines put the area in the crossfire of two warring armies in the summer of 1861.
— Courtesy of the Library of Congress

The Confederates built a complicated network of fortifications to defend Manassas Junction. Note the railroad running through the image.
— Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Basket used by the Marsteller family to gather eggs, fruits, or vegetables. The Manassas Museum's collection is home to many objects that speak to the farming life practiced by the families that lived here during the Civil War.
— Photograph by Don Flory
Manassas Museum Collection

 
Erected by City of Manassas, Virginia.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Orange and Alexandria Railroad marker series.
 
Location. 38° 44.931′ N, 77° 28.299′ W. Marker is in Manassas, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Prince William Street just west of Main Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9101 Prince William Street, Manassas VA 20110, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Manassas (a few steps from this marker);
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Manassas Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Wartime Manassas (within shouting distance of this marker); Occupation or Liberation (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Manassas 1905 - The Great Fire (about 400 feet away); Liberty Street (about 400 feet away); Site of Manassas Junction (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manassas.
 
Categories. AgricultureForts, CastlesRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 

More. Search the internet for War on the Landscape.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 30, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 30, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 34 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 30, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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