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Historical Markers and War Memorials in Manassas, Virginia

 
Clickable Map of Manassas, Virginia and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Manassas Ind. City, VA (65) Manassas Park Ind. City, VA (3) Prince William County, VA (622)  Manassas(65) Manassas (65)  ManassasPark(3) Manassas Park (3)  PrinceWilliamCounty(622) Prince William County (622)
Location of Manassas
    Manassas (65)
    Manassas Park (3)
    Prince William County (622)
 
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GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Virginia, Manassas — 9366 Main Street
This property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior Map (db m152407) HM
2Virginia, Manassas — A Railroad Town — 1865 - 1900
The railroad that brought such destruction to Manassas became the catalyst for its recovery. Returning residents and new arrivals built hotels, factories and businesses along the rail line. Trains exported local products to regional markets. As the . . . Map (db m143055) HM
3Virginia, Manassas — Battle of Bull Run Bridge — Liberia — Second Manassas Campaign —
In Aug. 1862, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee ordered Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson from the Rappahannock River to keep Gen. John Pope’s and Gen. George B. McClellan’s armies from uniting. Jackson marched on Aug. 25, and Lee followed . . . Map (db m13286) HM
4Virginia, Manassas — Burning of Manassas
Manassas Junction was twice destroyed by fire in the Civil War and badly damaged by fires in 1905 and 1911. The Confederates burned their base here in March 1862 to avoid seizure by the Federals and Stonewall Jackson destroyed the Federal base in . . . Map (db m2456) HM
5Virginia, Manassas — Campus Model
When the Manassas Industrial School for Colored Youth opened in October, 1894, classes were initially held in the Charter Cottage, a small house already on the site. Completion of Howland Hall later that year heralded a process of campus . . . Map (db m143084) HM
6Virginia, Manassas — Carnegie Building
Perhaps the greatest financial accomplishment of the Manassas Industrial School was convincing millionaire philanthropist Andrew Carnegie to donate $15,000 toward construction in 1910-11 of the academic building that bore his name. Housing . . . Map (db m143086) HM
7Virginia, Manassas — Charter Cottage
The building known as the Charter Cottage was already on this site when the Manassas Industrial School opened in 1894. Classes were held here during the first academic year until the completion of Howland Hall, and the Charter Cottage became a . . . Map (db m143089) HM
8Virginia, Manassas — Charter Cottage
Charter Cottage, giving birth to the Manassas Industrial School, was erected on this site in 1892 by the immortal Jennie Dean and her supportersMap (db m158824) HM
9Virginia, Manassas — Clover Hill Farm
In 1770 Patrick Hamrick sold this land to Rutt Johnson who used the land for crops and fruit trees and later added livestock. This property became known as CLOVER HILL FARM prior to 1852. During the Civil War the Johnson family left the area. When . . . Map (db m40212) HM
10Virginia, Manassas — Confederate Cemetery
Dedicated by the Ladies Memorial Association of Manassas, on August 30, 1889, to the heroes of Virginia and her sister states, who yielded their lives on July 18 & 21, 1861 & August 28, 29 & 30, 1862, in defense of the Confederate cause.Map (db m19815) HM
11Virginia, Manassas — Defenses of Manassas
In this vicinity stood a number of small earthworks erected by the Confederates in the summer of 1861 to protect the railroad and their army’s base here. The Confederates evacuated Manassas in March, 1862, destroying what militarily useful material . . . Map (db m2470) HM
12Virginia, Manassas — Hackley Hall
Hackley Hall, originally a frame men's dormitory built in 1808, was destroyed by fire in 1900. Its replacement, built the next year, was described in the 1902-1903 school catalog as "a beautiful brick building, the gift of Mrs. Frances Hackley of . . . Map (db m143097) HM
13Virginia, Manassas — Harry J. Parrish
Harry J. Parrish—The Man. Harry Jacob Parrish was born February 22, 1922 and has made Manassas his lifelong home. He attended Prince William county schools, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Wofford college, and schools of the US Air Force. . . . Map (db m702) HM
14Virginia, Manassas — Howland Hall
Built in 1894 with funds from Miss Emily Howland of Sherwood, New York. Howland Hall was the first building erected for use by the Industrial School. In January, 1895 (only four months after its completion) it burned to the ground. Despite this . . . Map (db m143083) HM
15Virginia, Manassas — Jackson's Raid — 1862
During the summer of 1862, Manassas Junction became a major supply hub for Union armies operating in Virginia, making it a target for the Confederates. On August 27, Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson unleashed his 24,000 troops on . . . Map (db m143054) HM
16Virginia, Manassas — Jane Serepta Dean
Despite being born into slavery in 1848 and without the benefit of a formal education, Jane "Jennie" Serepta Dean's vision changed the lives of countless area African Americans. While working as a domestic servant in Washington, she travelled home . . . Map (db m143088) HM
17Virginia, Manassas — Jennie Dean
Erected to the memory of Jennie Wade who founded The Manassas Industrial School in 1892Map (db m143090) HM
18Virginia, Manassas — Jennie Serepta Dean — The Manassas Industrial School Historic Site — Jennie Dean Memorial —
Though little known outside of Manassas, Jennie Serepta Dean was a significant figure in the field of education during the waning years of the nineteenth century. Born enslaved in 1848 in Prince William County, Dean received only a basic . . . Map (db m158827) HM
19Virginia, Manassas — Katie Hooe House
This structure reputedly is the oldest dwelling in Manassas. Part of the building is of log and is supposed to have been built before the Civil War. Most of the original houses of the hamlet of Tudor Hall—subsequently Manassas, were in the . . . Map (db m2415) HM
20Virginia, Manassas — Liberty Street
In the post-Civil War years, African-Americans who were bound by a strong sense of community settled near the Brown School and the Manassas Industrial School on what was then known as Liberty Avenue. As early as 1895, African-Americans began buying . . . Map (db m168231) HM
21Virginia, Manassas — Loy E. Harris
Loy E. Harris - The Man Through the years, Manassas has prospered because "community minded" people saw opportunities to make our City a better place. Loy E. Harris was one of these people. In the years before his death on August 17, . . . Map (db m143058) HM
22Virginia, Manassas — CL-4 — Manassas
According to tradition the name Manassas was derived either from an Indian source or from Manasseh, a Jewish innkeeper at Manassas Gap (35 miles west). The community originated in 1852 at the junction of the Manassas Gap and Orange & Alexandria . . . Map (db m23697) HM
23Virginia, Manassas — Manassas — A Critical Junction
If you had been here in July 1861, you could have seen Confederate soldiers jumping down from one train after another at the junction half a mile in front of you. The trains were bringing Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's army from the Shenandoah Valley on . . . Map (db m143074) HM
24Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1825 — Liberia Plantation — Plantation & Civil War Headquarters —
Built by the Weir family in 1825, this Federal-style home is one of the few pre-Civil War dwellings that remains in the area. Once a prosperous 2,000-acre plantation, Liberia had a general store, a post office, and a school, and boasted a successful . . . Map (db m28309) HM
25Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1850 — Katie Hooe House & Tudor Hall — A New Village —
The Kate Hooe House at 8920 Quarry Road is the only known building in the historic district believed to date from the pre-Civil War period, when Manassas was a small village at the junction of two railroad lines. This wood frame house contains a . . . Map (db m23798) HM
26Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1862 — Civil War Railroad Turntable & Repair Shop — Railroad Central to War —
In this vicinity stood the Civil War era Orange & Alexandria Railroad repair shops. Just east of Manassas City Hall stood the sidings and turntable of the railroad, used to reverse the direction of a train. When the Confederates evacuated the . . . Map (db m23825) HM
27Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1890 - 1900s — Railroad Work's Homes Add Variety to City Architecture — A Prosperous Town —
After the county seat moved to Manassas in 1892, and the Southern Railway continued to prosper, the area outside the core downtown and along the railroad track experienced a building boom. The new clapboard homes ranged in style from Italianate, . . . Map (db m23797) HM
28Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1892 — Annaburg Manor — Grand Summer Home —
Prussian-born Robert Portner, Alexandria brewer and businessman, built Annaburg in 1892 as his show place summer home and escape from the city. It became the center of beauty and interest with 35 rooms, electricity, and reportedly, one of the first . . . Map (db m28356) HM
29Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1900 — A Flurry of Construction — Speiden Leaves Mark on Town —
As Manassas grew and prospered in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the historic district filled with prominent homes, churches, and commercial buildings. The town had two banks and two newspapers. Telephone service began in 1895. Albert . . . Map (db m23826) HM
30Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1905 - The Great Fire — Courage & Determination Save Town
During the cold winter night of December 5, 1905, a smoldering fire began in Blossom's Alley across the tracks from the train depot. It soon raged through the young town of Manassas, destroying 35 homes, the post office, and business bordered by . . . Map (db m23773) HM
31Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1906 — Rebuilding Manassas — A Spirit of Optimism —
When the Civil War ended, newcomers and residents rebuilt the burned and devastated landscape around this vital railroad junction. The resulting town of Manassas, incorporated in 1873, quickly became the transportation and commercial hub of Prince . . . Map (db m23828) HM
32Virginia, Manassas — Manassas 1909 — Manassas Industrial School for Colored Youth Dairy Barn — Agricultural Pursuits —
The Manassas Industrial School for Colored Youth, founded by Jennie Dean and chartered in 1893 as a private residential school for African-American children, provided academic and vocational training in a Christian setting. By 1909, students had . . . Map (db m143087) HM
33Virginia, Manassas — Manassas Presbyterian Church
Built in 1875, this building served the congregation for 100 years. Built of locally quarried red sandstone, the church had original Tiffany windows which were removed to the new church. The church was shown in My Son John, a movie partially . . . Map (db m2471) HM
34Virginia, Manassas — Manassas Veterans Memorial
Dedicated in Honor and in Memory of Those Who Served Those Who Fought, and Those Who Fell ★★★ Freedom is Not Free "Duty, Honor, Country" U.S. Military Academy Motto With Honor They . . . Map (db m143079) WM
35Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — A Civil War Redoubt — The Manassas Museum System —
This 11-acre historic park, part of the Manassas Museum System, contains one of only two surviving Civil War fortifications in the City of Manassas. The earthwork was built by Confederate troops in the Spring of 1861 as part of the Manassas Junction . . . Map (db m2366) HM
36Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — The People and the Land — The Manassas Museum System —
American Indians lived on the land long before white settlers and slaves came to this area. Living in nomadic hunter-gatherer groups, people called the Dogues and the Mannahoacs roamed the Northern Virginia Piedmont region. Archaeological evidence . . . Map (db m2386) HM
37Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Unearthing the Past — The Manassas Museum System —
Archeology is the detective work of history. Evidence recovered from the soil often provides valuable clues for learning how people lived, worked, and died, especially when documentary sources are scarce. Excavations were conducted at the Hooe . . . Map (db m2393) HM
38Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Monster Manassas - How Strong a Stronghold? — The Manassas Museum System —
The Mayfield earthwork, known in military engineering terms as a redoubt, was a circle of raised earth some 200 feet in diameter. It may have included a retaining wall of timbers and brush, and planks to support artillery. While capable of . . . Map (db m2396) HM
39Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Firepower — The Manassas Museum System —
Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard, commander of the troops defending Manassas, had been one of the pre-war U.S. Army's outstanding artillerists. Fearing an imminent Union attack, he worked feverishly to obtain cannons for the fortifications and experienced . . . Map (db m2405) HM
40Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Quaker Guns — The Manassas Museum System —
Some of the Confederate cannons placed at Manassas and nearby Centreville were for show only. These non-functioning cannon were intended to deceive Union soldiers who might turn their telescopes on the earthworks: “This was nothing other . . . Map (db m2408) HM
41Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Fortifying the Junction — The Manassas Museum System —
Following Virginia’s decision to secede from the Union in in April 1861, Southern troops began arriving here at the small village of Tudor Hall, which soon came to be known as Manassas Junction. This place, where the Orange & Alexandria and Manassas . . . Map (db m41503) HM
42Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — The Changing Fortunes of War — The Manassas Museum System —
After the First Battle of Manassas on June 21, 1861, Confederate forces continued to hold Manassas Junction until March 1862. They evacuated Manassas and moved south in order to counter Union Gen. George B. McClellan’s plans to attack Richmond. . . . Map (db m41504) HM
43Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Manning the Fort — The Manassas Museum System —
The life of Civil War soldiers in camp was one of boredom, fear, mischief, disease and even death. Thousands of young men, many of whom had never before left their family farms or urban neighborhoods, were crowded into the makeshift camps. Disease . . . Map (db m41505) HM
44Virginia, Manassas — Occupation or Liberation
Eight months after their victory at the First Battle of Manassas (five miles north of here), the Confederates abandoned Manassas Junction, burning more than a million pounds of provisions and destroying the railroad line as they left. Days later, . . . Map (db m143053) HM
45Virginia, Manassas — Opera House
Built circa 1907. Served as the main community center for Manassas until the mid 1930s. It later was used by the Manassas Journal newspaper.Map (db m2472) HM
46Virginia, Manassas — Our Story Continues — 1900 - present
The decades of post-war growth in Manassas were nearly lost in 1905 when a disastrous fire destroyed more than 30 homes and businesses. Undeterred, local residents rebuilt bigger and better, setting the town on the path for the city we know . . . Map (db m152427) HM
47Virginia, Manassas — Route of the "Old 97"
On of the railroad traditions of Manassas was that it was on the route of Southern Railway's Fast Mail train No. 97. The "Fast Mails" were a 19th century creation of the railroads and the U.S. Post Office Department to expedite long distance mail . . . Map (db m143057) HM
48Virginia, Manassas — CL-2 — Ruffner Public School Number 1 — July 20, 1872
Named for Wm. H. Ruffner, Virginia’s first superintendent of public instruction, and opened as a public school on this date. Before free public schools were established by the Virginia constitution of 1869, a one room free school was in operation . . . Map (db m2425) HM
49Virginia, Manassas — Site of Manassas Junction
One mile west was the junction of the Orange and Alexandria and Manassas Gap Railroad lines. The point became known as Manassas Junction. During the Civil War both sides used the area as a supply base. The site of the first depot was probably about . . . Map (db m700) HM
50Virginia, Manassas — Steam Locomotive Tire Fire Alarm – 1909
One of the challenges for volunteer fire departments is how to alert their members to a fire. In July 1909, the Town of Manassas authorized Mr. J. I. Randall, the first town Fire Chief, to purchase three locomotive tires to be suspended in frames in . . . Map (db m392) HM
51Virginia, Manassas — Steam Locomotive Tire Fire Alarm – 1909
One of the challenges for volunteer fire departments is how to alert their members to a fire. In July 1909, the Town of Manassas authorized Mr. J. I. Randall, the first town Fire Chief, to purchase three locomotive tires to be suspended in frames in . . . Map (db m2417) HM
52Virginia, Manassas — The Manassas Industrial School / Jennie Dean Memorial
Welcome to Manassas Industrial School/Jennie Dean Memorial, part of The Manassas Museum System. This Memorial tells the story of an institution of learning that was unique in Northern Virginia and of the visionary African-American woman who . . . Map (db m143085) HM
53Virginia, Manassas — The Manassas Museum — Defending the Junction — First and Second Manassas Campaigns —
During the 1850s two railroad lines, the Orange & Alexandria and the Manassas Gap, intersected at a small Prince William County village that became known as Manassas Junction. In 1861 more than 20,000 Confederate troops from across the South . . . Map (db m41506) HM
54Virginia, Manassas — The Town Is Born — 1873 - 1915
As the twentieth century dawned, an emerging town stood on what was once battle-scarred land. Incorporated in 1873, Manassas included churches, businesses, banks, newspapers, a small force of police and firemen, and hundreds of homes. The influence . . . Map (db m143056) HM
55Virginia, Manassas — War on the Landscape — 1861
In the early summer of 1861, preparations for war made Manassas Junction one of the most famous places on earth. The railway junction held great strategic significance for the Confederacy, and the new nation assembled its largest army to defend . . . Map (db m143060) HM
56Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas — Prelude to First Manassas
(Preface): During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military . . . Map (db m2453) HM
57Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas — World’s First Military Railroad
(Preface): During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and Confederacy as a supply depot and for military . . . Map (db m2459) HM
58Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas — “Fortifications of Immense Strength”
During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . Map (db m2463) HM
59Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas — “On to Richmond!”
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . Map (db m2464) HM
60Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas — Jackson’s Daring Raid
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . Map (db m2465) HM
61Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas — The Curious Descend on Manassas for Curios
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . Map (db m2466) HM
62Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas — “The Sickness is Upon Us”
(During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . Map (db m2467) HM
63Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas — Confederates Withdraw to Richmond
During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. . . . Map (db m2468) HM
64Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas — "Defend that point against an attack"
During the Civil War, two railroads — the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria — intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military . . . Map (db m143093) HM
65Virginia, Manassas — Wartime Manassas — Walking and Driving Tours
The Manassas Museum System invites you to take walking and driving tours of the city’s historic Civil War sites. This map shows the locations of the sites featured on both tours. Copies of the map may be obtained inside the museum to take with you. . . . Map (db m155245) HM
66Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — "…Like a Stone Wall" — First Battle of Manassas —
On the brow of the hill Brig. Gen. Bernard Bee was desperately trying to rally his men when he caught sight of Thomas J. Jackson with fresh troops here at the edge of the pine thicket. "Look!" Bee shouted. "There stands Jackson like a stone wall! . . . Map (db m8304) HM
67Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — "The Very Vortex of Hell" — Second Battle of Manassas — Day Three - August 30, 1862 - 4:15 p.m. —
From their position atop this ridge, the soldiers of the 5th New York Infantry listened to the crash of battle. It appeared the regiment had escaped combat that day. Most of the fighting raged one mile to the north near Deep Cut. Around 4 p.m. an . . . Map (db m58858) HM
68Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — “The Unfinished Railroad”
These cuts and fills are what remain of the Independent Line of the Manassas Gap Railroad. The Independent Line was constructed in the mid-1850s to connect Gainesville, 5 miles to the west, with Alexandria, 25 miles to the east. After completing the . . . Map (db m658) HM
69Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 10th New York Vol. Infantry — National Zouaves
Erected by the State of New York, to commemorate the patriotic services of the 10th Reg't New York Volunteers National Zouaves Mustered into the U.S. Service April 27th 1861. Reorganized as a Battalion, April 27th 1863. Participated in 23 . . . Map (db m9836) HM
70Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 13th New York Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. 1st Brigade (Roberts), First Division (Morell) Fifth Corps (Porter), Army of the Potomac, USA 13th New York Infantry ("Rochester Regiment") Col. Elisha G. Marshall "The Rebel infantry poured in their volleys, and we . . . Map (db m18310) HM
71Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 15th Alabama Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade (Brown) Ewell's Division (Lawton) Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 15th Alabama Infantry Maj. A. A. Lowther "On the right the Federals were in an old field in plain view, and the . . . Map (db m18360) HM
72Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 15th Alabama Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 15th Alabama Infantry Maj. A. A. Lowther "My position in line at this fence was in the immediate rear of Alonzo Watson. We were . . . Map (db m39316) HM
73Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 19th Indiana Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas —
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 19th Indiana Infantry Col. Solomon Meredith "The enemy was secreted under cover of a fence and did not make their appearance . . . Map (db m8430) HM
74Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 1st Massachusetts Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 3:00 p.m. 1st Brigade (Grover), Second Division (Hooker) Third Corps (Heintzelman), Army of the Potomac, USA 1st Massachusetts Infantry Col. Robert Godwin “Without artillery and without supports, our men advanced. We . . . Map (db m40535) HM
75Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 20th New York State Militia — "Ulster Guard" — Second Battle of Manassas —
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. 3rd Brigade (Patrick), First Division (Hatch) Third Corps (McDowell) Army of Virginia (Pope), USA 20th New York State Militia (80th New York Volunteers) "Ulster Guard" Col. George W. Pratt "The order was given to . . . Map (db m18359) HM
76Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 21st Georgia Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 21st Georgia INfantry Capt. Thomas C. Glover "The fence being reached, the work of death commenced at short range. From this fence . . . Map (db m18298) HM
77Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 21st North Carolina Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 21st North Carolina Infantry Lt. Col. Sanders Fulton "We halted at this fence, quickly tore it down, and piled the rails in front. . . . Map (db m39432) HM
78Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 24th New York Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. 1st Brigade (Sullivan), First Division (Hatch) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 24th New York Infantry ("Oswego Regiment") Maj. Andrew Barney "Those of us on the embankment were too few to even attempt to . . . Map (db m18317) HM
79Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 26th Georgia Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Lawton's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 26th Georgia Infantry Maj. Eli S. Griffin "We were ordered in just after dark. We marched steadily across an open field for about . . . Map (db m18358) HM
80Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 2nd New Hampshire Infantry — First Battle of Manassas —
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Burnside), Second Division (Hunter) Army of Northeastern Virginia, USA 2nd New Hampshire Infantry Col. Gilman Marston "With the 71st New York State Militia on its left, the 2nd New Hampshire rushed to . . . Map (db m9734) HM
81Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 2nd New Hampshire Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 3:00 p.m. 1st Brigade (Grover), Second Division (Hooker) Third Corps (Heintzelman), Army of the Potomac, USA 2nd New Hampshire Infantry Col. Gilman Marston “There was a crash of Rebel musketry, an answering roar of . . . Map (db m40532) HM
82Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 2nd Rhode Island Infantry — First Battle of Manassas —
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Burnside) Army of Northeastern Virginia, USA 2nd Rhode Island Infantry Col. John S. Slocum "The 2nd was hotly engaged and made so gallant a fight as to push the enemy off the plateau and partly down . . . Map (db m9737) HM
83Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 2nd Wisconsin Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 2nd Wisconsin Infantry Col. Edgar O'Conner "Rebel infantry poured from the woods by the thousands. We were precisely on the . . . Map (db m8467) HM
84Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 45th Georgia Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 3:00 p.m. Thomas’ Brigade, A.P. Hill’s Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 45th Georgia Infantry Maj. W. L. Rice “General Hill had sent a courier previously for us to get out but we failed to get . . . Map (db m40525) HM
85Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 49th Georgia Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 3:00 p.m. Thomas’ Brigade, A.P. Hill’s Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 49th Georgia Infantry Lt. Col. S. M. Manning “The enemy made a dash at our brigade, about 1500 strong, and broke our . . . Map (db m40553) HM
86Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 4th Alabama Infantry — First Battle of Manassas —
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 3rd Brigade (Bee) Army of the Shenandoah (Johnson), CSA 4th Alabama Infantry Col. Egbert J. Jones "Our regiment had scarcely emerged from the timber before a murderous fire was opened on us by the Yankees. Our . . . Map (db m9730) HM
87Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 4th South Carolina Infantry — First Battle of Manassas —
July 21, 1861 6:30 a.m. 7th Brigade (Evans) Army of the Potomac (Beauregard), CSA 4th South Carolina Infantry Col. J.B.E. Sloan "Just before day on Sunday morning those of us on post nearest the Warrenton Turnpike heard the enemy . . . Map (db m9740) HM
88Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 5th Regiment New York Volunteer Infantry — Duryee Zouaves
Erected by the State of New York September 29, 1906, to commemorate the heroic services of the 5th Regiment New York Volunteer Infantry (Duryee Zouaves) ———————————— Here, . . . Map (db m9839) HM
89Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 63rd Pennsylvania Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 29, 1862 5:30 p.m. 1st Brigade (Robinson), First Division (Kearny) Third Corps (Heintzelman), Army of the Potomac, USA 63rd Pennsylvania Infantry Col. Alexander Hays “As the word “Charge!” rang out, we dashed forward . . . Map (db m40530) HM
90Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 6th Wisconsin Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 6th Wisconsin Infantry Col. Lysander Cutler "When at short range, Colonel Cutler ordered the regiment to halt and fire. We were . . . Map (db m39317) HM
91Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 71st New York State Militia — First Battle of Manassas —
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Burnside), 2nd Division (Hunter) Army of Northeastern Virginia, USA 71st New York State Militia Col. Henry P. Martin "The Alabama 4th, which had long ago expressed, in print, their desire to meet the . . . Map (db m9733) HM
92Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 73rd Ohio Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas —
August 30, 1862 5:00 p.m. 2nd Brigade (McLean), First Division (Schenk) First Corps (Sigel), Army of Virginia, USA 73rd Ohio Infantry Col. Orland Smith "The enemy in our front, moving in concert with those on our flank, came out of the . . . Map (db m9788) HM
93Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 76th New York Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. 2nd Brigade (Doubleday), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 76th New York Infantry ("Cortland County Regiment") Col. W.P. Wainwright "Waving their colors defiantly, the rebels advanced . . . Map (db m18278) HM
94Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Georgia Markers
Sometime after 1903, veterans of the 7th Georgia Infantry erected at least six markers on the Manassas battlefield to locate battle positions. Only this marker and one other approximately 350 yards southeast of here survive. Colonel Francis S. . . . Map (db m8236) HM
95Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Georgia Markers
Veterans of the 7th Georgia Infantry selected Manassas Battlefield as the site of their annual reunion in 1905. During their visit the group erected seven marble markers to denote the different positions occupied by the regiment at both battles. All . . . Map (db m155246) HM
96Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Georgia Regiment
5th Position 7th GA Regt. July 21, 1861.Map (db m155239) HM
97Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Wisconsin Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 7th Wisconsin Infantry Col. William W. Robinson "We soon found that we had to deal with General Ewell's whole division of . . . Map (db m39372) HM
98Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:30 p.m. 3rd Brigade (Butterfield), First Division (Morell) Fifth Corps (Porter), Army of the Potomac, USA 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry Capt. Thomas F. McCoy "The whole brigade went back pell mell together. It is probable that . . . Map (db m18314) HM
99Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 8th Georgia Infantry — First Battle of Manassas —
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Bartow) Army of the Shenandoah (Johnson), CSA 8th Georgia Infantry Lt. Col. W.M. Gardner "Away we went straight into the teeth of the murderous fire. We entered a thicket and were within 100 yards of . . . Map (db m9731) HM
100Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — A Debt Repaid
The stone rubble is all that remains of Christian Hill, the postwar home of Amos and Margaret Benson. Following the First Battle of Manassas, the Bensons discovered a wounded Union soldier, Private John Rice of the 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, left . . . Map (db m62052) HM

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Apr. 12, 2021