Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

White Bluffs in Dickson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Civil War in White Bluffs

Building the Railroad

 
 
The Civil War in White Bluffs Marker image. Click for full size.
By Darren Jefferson Clay, December 26, 2019
1. The Civil War in White Bluffs Marker
Inscription.  In 1862, the extension of the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad through White Bluffs to the Tennessee River brought not only growth to the area, but also chaos. Union forces stationed near here were responsible for constructing a depot, railroad turntable, telegraph office, and supply building, as well as protecting the newly laid tracks.

In order to delay the project, Confederate Capt. Alexander D. McNairy and Lt. Joseph Chester led a guerrilla band that raided the railroad. Two miles east of here, the A.B. Ayers sawmill provided the Federal army with lumber and water. McNairy's men derailed supply trains, killed laborers and guards, and burned the sawmill. At times, McNairy and his men camped along Main Street here, stopping at nearby houses for food and supplies.

The 5th Iowa Cavalry was stationed one mile west of here at Poplar Spring. McNairy placed his forces where he could ambush the Federal troopers and then retreat when pursued. As the construction of the rail facilities progressed, Union troops moved farther west. McNairy's men returned to White Bluffs, where they burned the telegraph office and several other
Chattanooga, Tenn., vicinity. Blockhouse on the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad image. Click for full size.
1864
2. Chattanooga, Tenn., vicinity. Blockhouse on the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad
Library of Congress [LC-B8171-2669]
buildings. Partisan attacks continued until the end of the war.

To Lt. Joseph Hedges, commanding 4th U.S. Cavalry: "Proceed with your command to White Bluffs on the line of the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad; …break any organized band of guerrillas you may encounter. Seize all the inhabitants suspected as being engaged in the destruction of the railroad train on the 20th November …and arrest and bring to Nashville any parties who cannot give a satisfactory account of themselves and their loyalty." —Gen. James H. Wilson, November 22, 1864

(captions)
Railroad guard camp and blockhouse, Tennessee Courtesy Library of Congress
Capt. Alexander D. McNairy Nashville & Northwestern History File
Lt. Joseph Chester Courtesy Tony England
Nashville & Northwestern Railroad, Cut 29 trestle Courtesy Tennessee State Library & Archives
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 6.5′ N, 87° 13.502′ W. Marker is in White Bluffs, Tennessee, in Dickson County. Marker is at the intersection of Broadway Street (U.S. 70) and Graham Street, on the left when traveling
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
west on Broadway Street. Located in front of White Bluff City Hall. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 52 Graham Street, White Bluff TN 37187, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. McNairy’s Attack (approx. 3 miles away); Birth of a Church (approx. 3.3 miles away); Connection To Johnsonville (approx. 6.2 miles away); Patterson Forge (approx. 7.2 miles away); Mound Bottom (approx. 7.3 miles away); Civil War In Charlotte (approx. 8 miles away); To All Who Served (approx. 8 miles away); Fighting for Freedom (approx. 9.2 miles away).
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 

More. Search the internet for The Civil War in White Bluffs.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 2, 2020. This page originally submitted on December 26, 2019, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia. This page has been viewed 29 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 26, 2019, by Darren Jefferson Clay of Duluth, Georgia.   2. submitted on January 2, 2020. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Wide shot of marker and its surroundings • Can you help?
Paid Advertisement