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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

St. Louis, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Stars' Park

Negro National League Baseball Played Here

 

1922-1931

 
Negro National League Baseball Played Here Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jason Voigt, January 1, 2020
1. Negro National League Baseball Played Here Marker
Inscription.  
A baseball park built for the Negro National League St. Louis Stars Stood on these Grounds

First professional baseball park in the United States of America owned exclusively by African Americans - built for the Negro National League St. Louis Stars - Originally called the giants, the club moved to this site from a park on North Broadway in St. Louis

Negro National League Champions in 1928 and 1930

James Thomas "Cool Papa" Bell played centerfield for the Stars 1922-1931 - He was inducted in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974

George "Mule" Suttles played five different positions for the Stars 1926-1931 - He was inducted in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006

Willie Wells played shortstop for the Stars 1924-1931 - He was inducted in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1997

Dedicated on May 2, 2007 by the Bob Broeg Chapter of the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) with permission of Harris-Stowe State University - Funding provided by the SABR chapter treasury and contributions from individual SABR members
 
Erected
Negro National League Baseball Played Here Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jason Voigt, January 1, 2020
2. Negro National League Baseball Played Here Marker
Marker is shown in front of where Stars' Park once stood
2007 by Bob Broeg Chapter of the Society for American Baseball Research.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Historically Black Colleges and Universities marker series.
 
Location. 38° 37.872′ N, 90° 13.563′ W. Marker is in St. Louis, Missouri. Marker is on Market Street 0.1 miles east of South Compton Avenue, on the right when traveling west. Marker is in front of an athletic field on the grounds of Harris-Stowe State University (Givens Campus), which is an HBCU. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3100 Market Street, Saint Louis MO 63103, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Moon Building (approx. 0.4 miles away); Dodge-Reo Building (approx. 0.4 miles away); Locomobile Building (approx. 0.4 miles away); Stearns-Knight Building (approx. 0.4 miles away); Durant-Star Building (approx. 0.4 miles away); Stutz Building (approx. 0.4 miles away); Cadillac-Chrysler Building (approx. 0.4 miles away); Ford Building (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Louis.
 
Regarding Stars' Park. The St. Louis Stars Negro League baseball team dates back to 1906, when they played as the St. Louis Giants. The Giants were an independent team until 1919 when they joined the Negro National League. The team name would change to the Stars in 1921,
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after a change in ownership. The Negro National League existed for only 12 years, and all teams ceased in 1931. Two National Baseball Hall of Famers that played for the Stars are not listed on here because they did not play at Stars Park: Oscar Charleston (1920-21, inducted in 1997) and Biz Mackey (1920, inducted in 2006).

The stadium opened on July 9, 1922. St. Louis Mayor Henry Kiel threw the first pitch, and the Stars would lose 4-0 against the Indianapolis A.B.C.'s. The ballpark held a capacity of 10,000. For several decades, the ballpark was widely known to not have any surviving photographs, until 2016 when a historian was going through someone's old items (see link below).
 
Also see . . .  Historian Hits Home Run With Rare Photo of Long-Gone Baseball Park. Contains the only surviving photo of the ballpark, along with the story about how it got unearthed (Submitted on January 1, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansParks & Recreational AreasSports
 

More. Search the internet for Stars' Park.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 2, 2020. This page originally submitted on January 1, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois. This page has been viewed 19 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 1, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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