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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Vandalia in Fayette County, Illinois — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Welcome to the National Road Interpretive Center

Vandalia, Illinois

 
 
Welcome to the National Road Interpretive Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jason Voigt, January 3, 2020
1. Welcome to the National Road Interpretive Center Marker
Inscription.  Come inside and live the story of the Historic National Road, the road that built the nation. Just thirty years after declaring independence from the British, the young nation was feeling the growing pains of westward expansion. President Thomas Jefferson, with the encouragement of Treasury Secretary Albert Gallatin, signed the first bill allowing the federal government to completely fund the construction of a road from Cumberland, Maryland to the Ohio River. As years passed, the project was expanded to include the new states of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois.

Sometimes called the Cumberland Road or the National Pike, this road provided the way for thousands of settlers to seek their fortune in the western frontier. For Illinois, the National Road's impact was unparalleled. According to census figures, the state's population jumped from 157,445 in 1830 to 476,183 in 1840.

The National Road Interpretive Center tells the story of the National Road from surveying through construction. There's also a Lincoln on the National Road room, a Conestoga wagon model, first hand traveler's accounts and an original National Road timber.
National Road Interpretive Center image. Click for full size.
By Jason Voigt, January 3, 2020
2. National Road Interpretive Center
Marker is on the right
Admission is free.

1806---President Jefferson signs legislation creating a National Road

1811---Construction begins at Cumberland, Maryland

1828---Surveying in Illinois begins

1830---Construction in Illinois begins

1838---Federal funding for National Road discontinued
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the The Historic National Road marker series.
 
Location. 38° 57.687′ N, 89° 5.756′ W. Marker is in Vandalia, Illinois, in Fayette County. Marker is on South 5th Street just north of West Gallatin Street, on the right when traveling north. Marker is mounted on the National Road Interpretive Center building. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 106 S 5th Street, Vandalia IL 62471, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Vandalia (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Elective Office (about 300 feet away); Second State Capitol (about 300 feet away); Where Did Lincoln Stay? (was about 400 feet away but has been reported missing. ); Site of Charters Hotel (was about 400 feet away but has been reported missing. ); The Charters Hotel (about 400 feet away); Ebenezer Capps' Store (about 400 feet away); Public Printer (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Vandalia.
 
Regarding Welcome to the National Road Interpretive Center.
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The National Road Interpretive Center in Illinois opened its doors in Vandalia (next to City Hall) on February 12, 2009, in conjunction with the 200th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's birth.
 
Also see . . .  National Road Interpretive Center. Official website (the link is on the marker) (Submitted on January 6, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.) 
 
Categories. Roads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 

More. Search the internet for Welcome to the National Road Interpretive Center.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 7, 2020. This page originally submitted on January 6, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 6, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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