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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Shonto in Navajo County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Gambel Oak

Quercus gambelii

 
 
Gambel Oak Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2016
1. Gambel Oak Marker
Inscription.  The most common oak in Navajoland has a hard, durable wood, which is still used for ax handles, weaving battens, and cradleboard hoops. The leafy branches are favored for shade ramadas in the summer. Solutions of root bark are used to dye wool and as a purifying drink during Navajo ceremonies.

The acorns of Gambel oak are less bitter than those of other oaks and were eaten by Navajos in former times. They were served raw, roasted, or as ground meal in stews or cakes.

NAVAJO name:
tsé ch’il "rock plant"

HOPI name:
kwingvi
 
Location. 36° 40.808′ N, 110° 32.477′ W. Marker is near Shonto, Arizona, in Navajo County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of State Highway 564 and County Route 221. Marker is located along the Aspen Forest Overlook Trail, about 1/4 mile north of the Navajo National Monument Visitor Center. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Shonto AZ 86054, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Douglas Fir (here, next to this marker); Serviceberry (a few steps from this marker); Rabbit Brush
Gambel Oak Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2016
2. Gambel Oak Marker (wide view)
(within shouting distance of this marker); A Relict Forest (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Indian Rice Grass (about 500 feet away); Big Sagebrush (about 500 feet away); Welcome to the Historic Contact Station (about 500 feet away); Sandal Trail (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Shonto.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Aspen Forest Overlook Trail, Navajo National Monument
 
Also see . . .  Quercus gambelii (Wikipedia). Historically, acorns from Gambel oak provided a reliable source of food for Native Americans. Gambel oak is an important food source for browsing animals such as deer and livestock. The sweetish acorns are frequently gathered by squirrels and stored for winter food; they are also eaten by wild turkeys and domestic animals such as hogs. The Colorado hairstreak butterfly uses it as a food source for caterpillars. (Submitted on January 14, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative Americans
 
Gambel Oak (<i>Quercus gambelii</i>)<br>(<i>located beside the trail, near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2016
3. Gambel Oak (Quercus gambelii)
(located beside the trail, near marker)
 

More. Search the internet for Gambel Oak
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Credits. This page was last revised on January 14, 2020. This page originally submitted on January 12, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 38 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 14, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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