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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Wappingers Falls in Dutchess County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Historic Carnwath Farms

 
 
Historic Carnwath Farms Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Herrick, January 8, 2020
1. Historic Carnwath Farms Marker
Inscription.  
Historic Carnwath Farms
Mr. William Henry Willis built Carnwath Manor Home in 1850 and called it Carnwath Farms. The name is derived from a Manor home set in Scotland. Just after the ending of the Civil War, General Barclay purchased the estate from Mr. Willis. In 1870, Mr. Francis Robert Rives who married the daughter of General Barclay, purchased Carnwath Farms. He added the east wing to the manor house, servant's quarters and the large rear kitchen. The formal Georgian appearance was changed to a less formal look which was preferred by late 19th century architects. In 1873, the Carriage House was built, modeled after French architecture, to hold Mr. Rives' horses. Years later his son, Reginald Rives, built the finest stable of harness and saddle horses in the county.

In the early 1900's the property, then known as Rives Hill was purchased by a New York attorney named Untermeyer who was famous for defending William "Boss" Tweed. In 1925 the Order of the Brothers of Hermits purchased the property and built the imposing Chapel in 1950, and the dormitory building in 1958 (now known as the Frances Reese Cultural Center),
Historic Carnwath Farms Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Herrick, January 8, 2020
2. Historic Carnwath Farms Marker
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this page online
which houses the Sports Museum of Dutchess County.

In 1980 the property was sold to Greystone Programs, Inc. The Town of Wappinger purchased the property in 2000 for the purpose of keeping open space and to develop it into a cultural center. It has 99.7 acres of beautiful land overlooking the majestic Hudson River, with scenic views of the Catskills.

Property consist of six buildings: Manor House, Chapel, Dormitory Building, Carriage House, Administration Building and "The Folly" Gazebo. The Greenway Trail is presently connected to the Carnwath trail network.

It is a lovely walk!
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Parks & Recreational Areas. A significant historical year for this entry is 1850.
 
Location. 41° 34.279′ N, 73° 56.99′ W. Marker is in Wappingers Falls, New York, in Dutchess County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Wheeler Hill Road and Carnwath Farms Lane, on the right when traveling south. Located at Carnwath Farms Historic site. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Wappingers Falls NY 12590, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Carnwath Farms (approx. 0.2 miles away); Gomez Mill House (approx. 1.9 miles away); Site of Zion Pilgrim M.E. Church (approx. 2.1 miles away); Mesier Park (approx. 2½ miles away); Presbyterian Church & Cemetery
The entrance gate to Historic Carnwath Farms image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Michael Herrick, January 8, 2020
3. The entrance gate to Historic Carnwath Farms
(approx. 2½ miles away); a different marker also named Mesier Park (approx. 2½ miles away); Washington’s Sword (approx. 3½ miles away); Enoch Crosby (approx. 3½ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wappingers Falls.
 
Also see . . .
1. Carnwath Farms. (Submitted on January 13, 2020, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Carnwath Farms Historic Site & Park (Wikipedia). (Submitted on January 13, 2020, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 13, 2020. It was originally submitted on January 13, 2020, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 86 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 13, 2020, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.

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Jul. 2, 2022