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Near West Liberty in Logan County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

From Generation to Generation

They Lived Long on the Land

 
 
From Generation to Generation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joel Seewald, October 12, 2019
1. From Generation to Generation Marker
Inscription.  
Benjamin M. Piatt, son of a Revolutionary War patriot, was raised on farms in New Jersey and later in Kentucky. As a young adult in the Cincinnati area, Benjamin's interests in commerce, real estate and law brought prosperity and the ability to acquire a 1,700 acre farm approximately one hundred miles to the north. Benjamin and his wife Elizabeth moved with their younger children and some grandchildren to their new farm in 1828.

The Piatt land was a mixture of fertile bottomland and wooded upland previously farmed by Shawnee People. Adapting the Shawnee place-name, the Piatts called their farmstead, Mac-o-cheek. With the assistance of his large family, farm ... eral tenants, Benjamin cleared the land, e ... e of waterpower for mills and developed a ... ural operation.

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Benjamin's land lay primarily in Monroe Township in Logan County, bordered on the west by Liberty Township and just north of the Champaign County border. By 1860, he had sold parcels he owned in Champaign County and given other lots to his daughters when they married. His son Donn, a writer, received a 77 acre parcel. To
From Generation to Generation Marker — left image image. Click for full size.
2. From Generation to Generation Marker — left image
1860 Logan County Map
his youngest son Abram, a farmer, Benjamin gave approximately 1,000 acres with "love and affection."

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After Benjamin's and Elizabeth's deaths, "The Old Home Place" was occupied by descendants or rented to tenants and laborers. It is pictured here in the early 20th century. In the 1970s the building was sold and reconstructed as a gift shop named "The Pioneer House."

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By 1875, a network of Piatt relatives lived on parcels of the original family farm. Donn expanded his estate when he acquired some additional land from his brother. Abram's son William managed the family sawmill and farmed on land he rented from his uncle Donn and other family members. Nearby, William's brothers Rivenoak John and Kentucky Ben each owned approximately 200 acres. At Abram's death, his remaining 600 acres were left to his living children and several grandchildren.

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"Mrs. Piatt laid out the grounds in walks, lawns, and mounds, planted hedges of the native hawthorn and arranged beds of flowers and borders of roses, both wild and cultivated, mingled with lilac and wax berries."* *From" Caroline Piatt Morris and Elizabeth McCullough Smith, Memorial Biography of Benjamin M. Piatt and Elizabeth, His Wife, c. 1880

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This image of the Piatt grist
From Generation to Generation Marker — upper middle image image. Click for full size.
3. From Generation to Generation Marker — upper middle image
In the 1820's, "Judge Piatt named his farm Mac-o-cheek, and having cleared away the forest from a plateau overlooking the prairie, he built a large double cabin of hewn logs."*
mill shows a small farmhouse across the road which might have been occupied by Piatt kin, laborers or renters. Both the mill and the house are now gone.

"Court News-Piatt Lands Divided
An amicable division of the Piatt lands was made in this city today. Anna P. Black and Emilie R. Piatt receive 75 acres in the southeast corner of the farm. The five minor children of Jacob I. Piatt, deceased, received all the Piatt land from west of the old mill road running north and south. The remainder. . . goes to William M. Piatt and Mary A. Worthington in common."
Bellefontaine Examiner, March 28, 1908
 
Erected by Ohio Humanities Council, The Mac-A-Cheek Foundation for the Humanities, Piatt Castles.
 
Location. 40° 15.051′ N, 83° 43.62′ W. Marker is near West Liberty, Ohio, in Logan County. Marker can be reached from Township Road 47. Marker is near the Mac-A-Cheek Castle, which is about 700 feet from Township Road 47. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 10051 Township Road 47, West Liberty OH 43357, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Over a Century of Tours (a few steps from this marker); A Castle as a Farmhouse (a few steps from this marker); Industry on the Macacheek (a few steps from this marker);
From Generation to Generation Marker — lower middle image image. Click for full size.
4. From Generation to Generation Marker — lower middle image
1875 Logan County Map
Who's in the Dog House? (within shouting distance of this marker); Let's Play (within shouting distance of this marker); Storing the Crops, Livestock and Machinery (within shouting distance of this marker); The Barn at Mac-A-Cheek Castle (within shouting distance of this marker); The Broad and Fertile Acres (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in West Liberty.
 
Categories. Agriculture
 
From Generation to Generation Marker — upper right images image. Click for full size.
5. From Generation to Generation Marker — upper right images
Left: Judge Benjamin M. Piatt (1779-1863); right: Elizabeth Barnett Piatt (1780-1865)
From Generation to Generation Marker — lower right image image. Click for full size.
6. From Generation to Generation Marker — lower right image
From Generation to Generation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joel Seewald, October 12, 2019
7. From Generation to Generation Marker
View looking toward the southwest, toward from Mack-A-Cheek "castle".
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on January 23, 2020. This page originally submitted on January 16, 2020, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan. This page has been viewed 36 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on January 16, 2020, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.
 
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