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Texas City in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Settlement Community

 
 
Settlement Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Samuel Collins III, September 27, 2014
1. Settlement Community Marker
Inscription.  During Reconstruction former slaves founded a community known as the Settlement on land platted by Judge William J. Jones for purchase by freedmen. Prior to this, a number of cattlemen moved to this area with their slaves. During the Civil War, George Washington Butler was placed in charge of a containment camp and used slave labor from there to drive cattle for the Confederate Army. After the war ended, Butler continued in the cattle industry, hiring freedmen as Cowboys. Some of them lived in the community first known as Highland Tank.

The first settlers were Kneeland and Slyvia Britton,and Albert and Priscilla (Britton) Phillips. Calvin Bell, Thomas Britton and David Hobgood were area Cowboys and pioneers of the community. By 1870 the Rev. Israel S. Campbell helped begin a church; residents built a sanctuary and school the following year in a community called Campbellville for the Reverend. Pioneering families, however called it Settlement shortened from “Our Settlement,” declaring the importance of freedom and owning land.

The African American community prospered throughout the late 1800s. Many male residents
Settlement Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Samuel Collins III, September 27, 2014
2. Settlement Community Marker
The marker is just inside the picket fence on the left in this view.
worked on Butler Ranch or as farmers. Also, unique for the time, the community had a high literacy rate. By the early 1900s residents worked in railroad occupations and later in industry. In 1911, an interurban line came through the community, and Highland Station opened; the Settlement was known as Highlands and La Marque until it was incorporated into the city limits of Texas City in the 1950s. The community began to decline in the 1960s, when many young people left to work in an integrated society. However, rodeos and trail rides have been held as reminders of this once flourishing and self-sufficient community founded by African American Cowboys.
 
Erected 2007 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13958.)
 
Location. 29° 22.938′ N, 94° 58.634′ W. Marker is in Texas City, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker is at the intersection of South Bell Drive and Jackson Lane, on the right when traveling south on South Bell Drive. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 117 S Bell Dr, Texas City TX 77591, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. 1887 Frank Sr. and Flavilla Bell House (here, next to this marker); La Marque (approx. 0.7 miles away); Frank Bell Jr. (approx. one mile away); Paul's Union Church
Community celebration 2014 image. Click for full size.
By Samuel Collins III, September 27, 2014
3. Community celebration 2014
(approx. 1.9 miles away); Galilee Missionary Baptist Church (approx. 2.8 miles away); S.S. Grandcamp Anchor (approx. 3 miles away); Texas City Memorial Cemetery (approx. 3 miles away); Stringfellow Orchards (approx. 3.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Texas City.
 
Also see . . .
1. Keeping the history of Settlement alive. (Submitted on February 13, 2020, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
2. Brief Reference to the Settlement. (Submitted on February 13, 2020, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
3. More stories from Settlement's past and its people. (Submitted on February 13, 2020, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
 
Categories. African AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Settlement Community - Frank Bell's Home image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, January 16, 2020
4. Settlement Community - Frank Bell's Home
Dedication of Frank Bell's Home as the Symbol for the Settlement Community image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, January 16, 2020
5. Dedication of Frank Bell's Home as the Symbol for the Settlement Community
Story of Frank and Flavilla Bell and their descendants image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, January 16, 2020
6. Story of Frank and Flavilla Bell and their descendants
Click on the image to expand it to a readable size.
 

More. Search the internet for Settlement Community.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 13, 2020. This page originally submitted on September 27, 2014, by Samuel Collins III of Hitchcock, Texas. This page has been viewed 482 times since then and 30 times this year. Last updated on February 12, 2020, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. Photos:   1. submitted on September 27, 2014, by Samuel Collins III of Hitchcock, Texas.   2, 3. submitted on September 28, 2014, by Samuel Collins III of Hitchcock, Texas.   4, 5, 6. submitted on January 17, 2020, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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