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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

…to Manhattan

 
 
...to Manhattan Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Larry Gertner, December 1, 2018
1. ...to Manhattan Marker
Inscription.  
Native people from many tribal nations have long come to Manhattan as visitors and workers, artists and diplomats. Many of the city’s skyscrapers were constructed with the assistance of Mohawk steel workers looking down on a city that hardly knew they were there. The 1990 census shows 27,531 Native Americans in New York City. The American Indian Community House, founded in 1969, is a cultural and social support center strengthening Manhattan as a place of native homecoming.

The Europeans who came here recognized the island as an ideal trade center, seeking to own the land Delaware people saw as their mother. Dutch, French and English all competed for Manhattan Island. From 1626 to 1664, the Dutch colonized it and called it New Netherlands. Although no deed exists, Peter Minuit, first governor of New Netherlands, reportedly “purchased” the island from native people called “Manhattans” (ironically, probably the Canarsie people from Brooklyn) for sixty guilders worth of trading goods in 1626. The English finally won possession of Manhattan from the Dutch in 1664, but Native people lost the most. battles with Europeans for land and
...to Manhattan marker site image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Larry Gertner, December 1, 2018
2. ...to Manhattan marker site
The bank of markers left of the main entrance.
Click or scan to see
this page online
against diseases they brought killed vast numbers of Indian people.

Yet American Indians never vanished from Manhattan. Although not as visible as in the seventeenth century, Indian people continue to survive and contribute to the city’s cultural landscape.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Native Americans.
 
Location. 40° 42.266′ N, 74° 0.814′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is on Whitehall Street north of Stone Street, on the left when traveling north. The marker is one of several in a bank to the left of the main entrance to the National Museum of the American Indian. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: One Bowling Green, New York NY 10004, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. From Menatay… (here, next to this marker); A Place Of Many Names (here, next to this marker); Menatay, An Island Crossroads (here, next to this marker); Lower Manhattan Today (here, next to this marker); Drawn To The City (here, next to this marker); The Marketplace (a few steps from this marker); “North America” sculpted by Daniel Chester French (a few steps from this marker); Places of Exchange (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
National Museum of the American Indian (and Federal Bankruptcy Court) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Larry Gertner, 1999
3. National Museum of the American Indian (and Federal Bankruptcy Court)
Formerly the Alexander Hamilton Custom House. The marker bank is to the left of the entrance.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 18, 2022. It was originally submitted on March 4, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 193 times since then and 38 times this year. Last updated on March 8, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 4, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.

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Nov. 30, 2022