Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cahaba in Dallas County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Mound at Old Cahawba Archaeological Park

Alabama Indigenous Mound Trail

 
 
The Mound at Old Cahawba Archaeological Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 1, 2020
1. The Mound at Old Cahawba Archaeological Park Marker
Inscription.  Between AD 1500 and 1600, the indigenous inhabitants of the area around the confluence of the Cahaba and Alabama Rivers built a flat-topped mound measuring about ½ acre in size. The mound was the central feature of a semicircular village tucked inside a large defensive wall and surrounded by a moat. This village was the northern political center of a coastal Mississippian culture that controlled much of the region. Archaeologists have uncovered artifacts here that show how the inhabitants of the village were culturally connected to indigenous groups both at Moundville to the north and to those affiliated with the Pensacola phase along the Gulf Coast to the south.

In 1819, Alabama's first governor, William Wyatt Bibb, incorporated these earthworks into the centerpiece of the town plan he designed for Alabama's first capital. While today, you can still see a portion of the moat, the large mound inside the moat is no longer present. Historical records indicate that the mound was removed and used as fill in the construction of a nearby railroad embankment in the 1850s.

This site is very important to numerous Southeastern

View of marker in front of flat-topped mound between the moat. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 1, 2020
2. View of marker in front of flat-topped mound between the moat.
Click or scan to see
this page online
indigenous tribes who assert an ancestral connection with those who built and occupied Alabama's ancient mounds. The earthwork landscapes and the objects and information recovered from them reveal a rich cultural tradition that still thrives today among these tribes. Our indigenous mound sites represent a heritage for all Alabamians to cherish, and it is important that we protect and preserve them for future generations.

Map caption:
The 1817 "Freeman Map" shows the location of the mound and surrounding moat, labelled as "Ancient Indian work."

 
Erected 2019 by Alabama Historical Commission, the University of Alabama Center for Economic Development, the University of Alabama Museums.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1500.
 
Location. 32° 19.037′ N, 87° 5.794′ W. Marker is in Cahaba, Alabama, in Dallas County. Marker is at the intersection of Vine Street and Capitol Avenue, on the right when traveling north on Vine Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Vine Street, Orrville AL 36767, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Vine Street (here, next to this marker); Cahaba First State Capital (a few steps from this

View from marker towards Cahaba First State Capital stone memorial. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 1, 2020
3. View from marker towards Cahaba First State Capital stone memorial.
The tents on left are archaeologists digs for artifacts in the old State Capital building area.
marker); Welcome to Downtown Cahawba (a few steps from this marker); Railroad Depot and Commissary (within shouting distance of this marker); Alabama's First Statehouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Captive Boys in Blue (within shouting distance of this marker); Cahawba - circa 1500 (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Alabama's Statehouse (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cahaba.
 
Also see . . .  The Mound at Old Cahawba Archaeological Park web page. (Submitted on June 1, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
The 1817 Freeman Map image. Click for full size.
By Cahawba Advisory Committee
4. The 1817 Freeman Map
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 1, 2020. It was originally submitted on June 1, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 80 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 1, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=150834

Paid Advertisement
Apr. 10, 2021