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Pulaski in Giles County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Thomas Martin (1799-1870)

Pulaski Heritage Trail

 
 
Thomas Martin (1799-1870) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, June 6, 2020
1. Thomas Martin (1799-1870) Marker
Inscription.  Thomas Martin epitomized what is meant by “Good Citizen.” With others of his time, Martin was recognized for energy, perseverance, integrity, liberality and enlarged views of public policy. He left an impression for good on each succeeding generation.

Born in Albemarle County, Virginia on December 16, 1799, Martin moved to Giles County in 1818 and married Nancy Topp in 1824. The Martin family grew to include a daughter, Victoria, who was to play a pivotal role in her father's philanthropic decision to provide an education for females in Giles County.

Thomas' career began early and lasted long. At age eighteen he began a business on the Pulaski Square and quickly gathered a small fortune. His business partner proved unscrupulous and the money was gone. Martin took upon himself the obligation of the repayment of the debt and went back into business with the promise, “If God gives me life and strength, every dollar shall be paid.” Such honesty and moral certitude earned him the respect of everyone in the Pulaski business community.

• Founder of a Female School, honoring his daughter's
Thomas Martin (1799-1870) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, June 6, 2020
2. Thomas Martin (1799-1870) Marker
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dying request. The institution now stands as Martin Methodist College

• Elected Mayor of Pulaski, he declined President James K Polk's request to serve as Secretary of the Treasury, preferring to honor his commitment to the citizens who elected him mayor

• Was instrumental in bringing the railroad to Pulaski

• Willed stock to be used for Maplewood Cemetery

“No man ever enjoyed more fully the confidence of the community in which he lived, and none ever more deserved it.”
 
Erected by City of Pulaski.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesCharity & Public WorkEducationWomen. A significant historical date for this entry is December 16, 1799.
 
Location. 35° 11.589′ N, 87° 1.738′ W. Marker is in Pulaski, Tennessee, in Giles County. Marker can be reached from South Rhodes Street just north of East Cemetery Street, on the right when traveling north. The marker is located in Maplewood Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 524 S Rhodes St, Pulaski TN 38478, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Thomas McKissack Jones (here, next to this marker); General John Calvin Brown (a few steps from this marker); Aaron V. Brown (a few steps from this marker); Neill Smith Brown
Thomas Martin image. Click for full size.
By Unknown artist
3. Thomas Martin
Martin founded Martin Methodist College in 1870. This oil on wood portrait hangs in the college's Colonial Hall. (Courtesy Tennessee Portrait Project)
(within shouting distance of this marker); Maplewood Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); General John Adams, CSA (within shouting distance of this marker); James M. McCallum (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); John Goff Ballentine (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pulaski.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 10, 2020. It was originally submitted on June 9, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 51 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 9, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 14, 2021