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St. Marys in Elk County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

General Edward C. Meyer

 
 
General Edward C. Meyer Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Wintermantel
1. General Edward C. Meyer Marker
Inscription.  
Military Career
General Edward C. "Shy" Meyer has served the nation, the Army and West Point with great distinction. In particular, his services as a commander and staff officer in combat, his direction of Army modernization and force development during the Cold War, his contributions to strategic studies and joint operations, his leadership of the Association of Graduates and other organizations and his service as Chief of Staff of the United States Army have made him a prominent and distinguished figure in the effort to guarantee the security of the free world.

Korean and Vietnam Wars
Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Infantry, General Meyer was first assigned to Korea in 1952 where he commanded a nfle company in the 40th Infantry Division and later served as battalion intelligence officer. His awards ,i,ncluded the Silver Star for gallantry in action, rescuing a British pilot behind enemy lines, and the Bronze Star with V device for heroic achievement.

The next phase of General Meyer's career broadened his operational experience and continued his exposure to the political-military issues that
General Edward C. Meyer Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Wintermantel
2. General Edward C. Meyer Marker
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he would face in the higher-level command and staff positions. In addition to Command and General Staff College and the Armed Forces Staff College, assignments to Headquarters, U.S. Army Europe, and the Office of the Chief of Staff, Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers Europe as well as the Office of the Chief of Staff of the Army expanded his base of experience and expertise. General Meyer attended the National War College earning a Master's Degree in International Affairs from George Washington University. General Meyer's military career included two tours in Vietnam. In 1965 he commanded a battalion in the 1st Air Cavalry Division. He returned to Vietnam from 1969 to 1970 commanding a brigade in the 1st Air Cavalry Division and served as the division's Chief of Staff during the Cambodian Incursion in 1970. Bravery, concern for his soldiers, tactical innovation, and skillful coordination of fluid, complex operations characterized his combat leadership in Vietnam. Service awards in Vietnam included a second Silver Star for gallantry in action and the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism.

Upon his return from Vietnam, General Meyer was assigned to the Brookings Institute as its first military Federal Executive Fellow. He then served as Assistant Division Commander of the 82nd Airborne Division, where he was especially noted for his inspiring leadership. Subsequent assignments
General Edward C. Meyer image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mike Wintermantel
3. General Edward C. Meyer
as the Deputy Commandant of the Army War College and Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, Headquarters, U.S. Army Europe, preceded General Meyer's selection in 1974 to command the 3rd Infantry Division in Germany. It was during this period that he widened his focus to take in the entire Army and its preparedness to fight across the broad spectrum of wars and conflicts the nation would face in the years ahead.

Senior Commands and Chief of Staff
In 1975 General Meyer was assigned to the Department of the Army staff, and served as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans. In 1979 he was selected by President Carter to become the 29° Chief of Staff of the United States Army, a position he held until his retirement in 1983. As Chief of Staff, his priorities included improving the equipping of the force and manning of force structure with trained soldiers and noncommissioned officers. During these years in the Pentagon, his clear institutional vision and ability to articulate the Army's mission needs were critical in modernizing the force, increasing its operational agility, improving the integration of the reserve components into the total force and developing organizations and readiness for joint operations. The Army that fought and won so rapidly in Desert Storm was, to a large extent, forged during the tenure of General Meyer as Chief of Staff of
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the United States Army.

Personal Life
General Edward C. "Shy" Meyer was born December 11, 1928 in St. Mary's, Pennsylvania, son of Edward L. and Cecelia Kosko Meyer. His siblings are Marylou, Karl, George (deceased in infancy), Jake and Paula. He attended Sacred Heart School and graduated from St. Mary's Central Catholic High School in 1946. He was an Eagle Scout of Sacred Heart Troop 95. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1951. While at West Point, he was captain and first team All-American on the 1951 National Champion Lacrosse Team. In 1954 he married Carol McCunniff and they have five children; Thomas, Timothy, Douglas, Nancy and Mary Stuart. Following his 36 years of military service, General Meyer served on various presidential and defense boards and panels and as Trustee for the George Marshall Foundation. He also served on boards for various foundations and corporations. He is the recipient of three honorary doctoral degrees.
 
Erected by City of St. Marys.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: War, KoreanWar, Vietnam. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #39 James Earl "Jimmy" Carter, Jr. series list. A significant historical date for this entry is December 11, 1928.
 
Location. 41° 25.63′ N, 78° 33.674′ 
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W. Marker is in St. Marys, Pennsylvania, in Elk County. It is in . Marker is on South St. Mary's Street, 0.1 miles north of West Mill Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2 S St Marys St, Saint Marys PA 15857, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Franklin House Hotel (here, next to this marker); Weis Stone Buildings (within shouting distance of this marker); St. Marys (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Decker's Chapel (approx. 1.8 miles away); First State Game Lands (approx. 7.8 miles away); James Gallagher Home (approx. 8.6 miles away); Calvin and Juliet McCauley Mansion (approx. 8.6 miles away); Ridgway Opera House (approx. 8.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Marys.
 
Additional commentary.
1.
He has an article on Wikipedia; information from there was that he died on October 13, 2020 in Arlington, Virginia.
    — Submitted November 7, 2020, by Carl Gordon Moore Jr. of North East, Maryland.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 28, 2020. It was originally submitted on June 27, 2020, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 248 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 27, 2020, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

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Jan. 29, 2023