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Connersville in Fayette County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Grinding Stones

 
 
Grinding Stones Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Bosse, June 21, 2020
1. Grinding Stones Marker
Inscription.  
The grinding wheels around Kiddie Land Playground in Roberts Park were originally part of the manufacturing equipment in the Ansted Spring and Axle Company, located on the east side of Columbia Avenue just north of Mount Street. The Ansted industrial park included two main divisions, the Spring Works and the Axle Works.

Steel springs were used on buggies, carriages and other horse drawn vehicles. The stone wheels were used to grind and shape those springs. The wheels were driven by a steel shaft known as an arbor. The arbor was pushed through a square hole in the center of the wheel and a pulley belted to a line shaft would rotate the stone. Physical pressure was required to hold the springs against the grinding stones during this process.

At one time new buggies were shipped from Connersville factories by the trainload. The Ansted Company supplied its patented Swan Loop Buggy Springs to local carriage manufacturers and to other manufacturing companies throughout the United States.
 
Erected by The Questers.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & Commerce
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Parks & Recreational Areas. A significant historical date for this entry is November 8, 1973.
 
Location. 39° 40.26′ N, 85° 7.513′ W. Marker is in Connersville, Indiana, in Fayette County. Marker can be reached from North Park Road, 0.1 miles north of East 28th Street. Marker is located within Roberts Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9 Park Rd, Connersville IN 47331, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. James E. Roberts Memorial Building (within shouting distance of this marker); World's First County Free Fair (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Pavilion: and other park structures (about 600 feet away); History of the Pavilion (about 600 feet away); The Longwood Covered Bridge (approx. ¼ mile away); Clio Fountain (approx. 1.4 miles away); On This Site John Conner Operated a Two Story Log Indian Trading Post 1808~1815 (approx. 1.8 miles away); "Birthplace of the Blower" (approx. 2.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Connersville.
 
More about this marker.
[Captions:]
Connersville News Examiner, November 8, 1973. Pictured, William Blommel worked at Ansted Spring and Axle Company from 1913 – 1916. (Crone Photo)

Ansted Spring and Axle Works – Spring Works 1906
Grinding Stones Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Tom Bosse, June 21, 2020
2. Grinding Stones Marker
View of the Company
In 1924 the Ansted Spring and Axle Company sold and the name changed to Connersville Steele Products Company. The building sat idle during the Great Depression and reopened in 1938 by Better Connersville Association. The Stant Manufacturing Company bought the building in 1941 and donated the wheels to Roberts Park in 1943.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Ansted Spring and Axle Works image. Click for full size.
3. Ansted Spring and Axle Works
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 28, 2020. It was originally submitted on June 28, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 531 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 28, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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May. 27, 2024