Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pocahontas in Hinds County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Ceremonial Mounds Of The Southeast

 
 
Ceremonial Mounds Of The Southeast Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, February 15, 2009
1. Ceremonial Mounds Of The Southeast Marker
Inscription.  
Mississippi Mounds
Two main types of mound were constructed by American Indians in Mississippi: burial mounds and platform mouds. The Pocahontas archaeological site has one of each of these mounds. Mound A, which you see in front of you, is a platform mound and Mound B, which is located across Highway 49 on private land, is a 10 feet tall burial mound.

Platform mounds served as elevated platforms upon which wooden buildings often were built. It is commonly believed by archeologists that these mound-top structures were built as residences for the religious or secular leaders of American Indian communities. The construction of mounds by American Indians began about 6000 years ago during the Middle Archaic Period; however, archaeologists have yet to determine their function. It is still unclear whether or not these early mounds were used as platforms. The use of mounds that are clearly understood as platform mounds began about 2000 years ago during the time that archeologists refer to as the Woodland period (about 3000 to 1000 years ago). The tradition continued into the Mississippian period (about 1000 to 500 years
A clay bowl image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, February 15, 2009
2. A clay bowl
Click or scan to see
this page online
ago), and was still active in the 16th and 17th centuries A.D., when first the Spanish, and later French explorers made contact with the native inhabitants of the Southeast.

Burial mounds, which are conical in shape, were constructed primarily during the Woodland period; however Mound B at Pocahontas is believed to be approximately the same age as Mound A. Archeologists believe that the individuals who were laid to rest in Mound B held a special status with the community. They may have been elders or community leaders who were viewed as having great prestige. Elaborate and exotic grave goods are often found in burial mounds. The artifacts shown to the far right, are examples of grave goods taken from the conical grave mound at Pocahontas in the early 1900s.

Honoring The Dead
The burial of individuals in conical mounds was undoubtedly and elaborate and dramatic ritual event meant to bestow honor upon the deceased. Clearly, the mounds were meant to stand for generations as monuments honoring the lives of individuals buried within.

Unfortunately, a great number of American Indian burial mounds have been destroyed in the past 200 years by the indifference of land developers, the greed of grave robbers, and the curiosity of archaeologists. However, over the past 30 years archaeologists have become much more sensitive to American
An axe head image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, February 15, 2009
3. An axe head
Indian’s concerns about the disturbance of their ancestor’s graves. During this time a partnership has developed archaeologists, American Indians, and the federal government, to help insure that these ancient monuments stand for many generations to come. Numerous state and federal laws exist to protect American Indian burials. For example, the Mississippi Antiquities Act makes the disturbance o such burials illegal and require those convicted to be subjected to monetary fines and/or imprisonment.
 
Erected by Mississippi Department of Transportation/ Cobb Institute of Archeology, Mississippi State University.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Native Americans.
 
Location. 32° 28.12′ N, 90° 17.346′ W. Marker is in Pocahontas, Mississippi, in Hinds County. Marker is on U.S. 49 (U.S. 49) 0.8 miles south of Kennebrew Road, in the median. Located in Pocahontas Mounds Roadside Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 13886 US 49, Jackson MS 39209, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Landscape Modification in Prehistoric Times (a few steps from this marker); Pocahontas Mounds (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Midden: Sifting Through the Trash (about 400 feet away); The Evolution of the Pocahontas Site
Conical Burial Mound image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, February 15, 2009
4. Conical Burial Mound
(about 600 feet away); Environmental Archaeology (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Pocahontas Mounds (about 700 feet away); Stone Fence Posts Mid-Western Kansas 1880’s (approx. 3.8 miles away); Osburn Stand (approx. 5.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pocahontas.
 
Clay Pipe image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, February 15, 2009
5. Clay Pipe
Wide View Ceremonial Mounds Of The Southeast Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, February 15, 2009
6. Wide View Ceremonial Mounds Of The Southeast Marker
An Earspool image. Click for full size.
By Roger Dean Meyer, February 15, 2009
7. An Earspool
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 13, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 11, 2020, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 58 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on July 11, 2020, by Roger Dean Meyer of Yankton, South Dakota.

Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=152558

Paid Advertisement
Apr. 21, 2021