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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Mandan in Morton County, North Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Fort Abraham Lincoln Infantry Post

 
 
Fort Abraham Lincoln Infantry Post Marker image. Click for full size.
By Connor Olson, August 11, 2019
1. Fort Abraham Lincoln Infantry Post Marker
Inscription.  This United States military post was established as Fort KcKeen, June 14, 2872 by companies "B" and "C" of the 6th Infantry under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Daniel Huston Jr. It was named in commemoration of Colonel H. Boyd McKeen of the 81st Pennsylvania Volunteer, who lost his life in the Battle of Cold Harbor during the Civil War. the name of this post changed to Fort Abraham Lincoln on November 19, 1872. With the establishment of the cavalry post the next year on the flat below, the name of Abraham Lincoln designated both garrisons. The Primary purpose of these posts was to protect the surveyors and construction parties of the Northern Pacific Railway.

Indian raids at and near this site were quite common during 1872 and 1973. On a number of occasions small detachments of troops from the post were attacked by Indians lying in ambush along the trail a short distance from the fort. Favorite spots for these ambushes were the brushy ravines immediately to the north of the blockhouses. In several instances the Indians forced the soldiers to return to the blockhouses were additional help was summoned to drive the Indians away. When

Fort Abraham Lincoln Infantry Post Marker image. Click for full size.
By Connor Olson, August 11, 2019
2. Fort Abraham Lincoln Infantry Post Marker
the Fort Lincoln troops were engaged in the Campaign of 1876 the Indians attacked the outer guards at this post on several occasions.

During the most active years of Fort Abraham Lincoln, infantry troops were stationed at this site while the cavalry troops were stationed at the cavalry post below. In the latter years of Fort Lincoln the Government dismantled the buildings on this site and moved the lumber down to the cavalry post. After this time the troops were stationed at the cavalry post only. The present blockhouses were restored in 1933 on the original sites.

The plat at the left shows the arrangement and location of the original buildings at the fort. The plat at the right includes the arrangement and location of the buildings of both the cavalry and infantry posts.
 
Erected 1956 by State Historical Society of North Dakota.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts or CastlesNative AmericansWars, US Indian. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #16 Abraham Lincoln series list.
 
Location. 46° 46.17′ N, 100° 51.288′ W. Marker is near Mandan, North Dakota, in Morton County. Marker can be reached from Fort Lincoln Road 1.8 miles north of State

Fort Abraham Lincoln Infantry Post reconstructed blockhouse. image. Click for full size.
By Connor Olson, August 11, 2019
3. Fort Abraham Lincoln Infantry Post reconstructed blockhouse.
Route 1806, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4480 Fort Lincoln Rd, Mandan ND 58554, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Blockhouses & Palisades (within shouting distance of this marker); Officers' Quarters (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Barracks (about 600 feet away); Powder Magazines (about 800 feet away); Post Hospital (about 800 feet away); Laundress' Quarter: "Suds Row" (approx. 0.2 miles away); Scouts (approx. 0.2 miles away); Schoolhouse (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mandan.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 20, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 19, 2020, by Connor Olson of Lemmon, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 36 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 19, 2020, by Connor Olson of Lemmon, South Dakota. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.
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Jan. 21, 2021