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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Wilkes-Barre in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Crabapple

Pyrus coronaria

 
 
Crabapple Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 19, 2020
1. Crabapple Marker
Inscription.  

This is a small tree with short trunk, spreading branches and broad, open crown. It grows in moist soils of valleys and borders of forests and old fields. The fruit is consumed by many birds and mammals. The hard, heavy wood has been used for tool handles and fuel.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Natural Features.
 
Location. 41° 14.761′ N, 75° 53.256′ W. Marker is in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, in Luzerne County. Marker is on River Street south of Northampton Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 110 South River Street, Wilkes Barre PA 18702, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Wyoming (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Fort Wyoming (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Slattery Home Site (about 500 feet away); Veterans Memorial Court (about 600 feet away); Franz Kline (1910 - 1962) (about 600 feet away); John L. Lewis Speech (about 600 feet away); The Sullivan Expedition against the Iroquois Indians

Crabapple Tree and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 19, 2020
2. Crabapple Tree and Marker
(about 600 feet away); The Roberts Tower (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wilkes-Barre.
 
More about this marker. The tree and marker are between Evans Hall and Conyngham Hall, part of Wilkes University's Grayson Arboretum.
 
Regarding Crabapple. While there is limited historical information on the marker, most people probably have no idea that crabapple wood has been used for tool handles; the contributor didn't!
 
Also see . . .  New arboretum sets down roots at Wilkes (Citizens' Voice, 2012). (Submitted on July 20, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 20, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 20, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 33 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 20, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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Feb. 28, 2021