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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Pagosa Springs in Archuleta County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Welcome to Chimney Rock National Monument

An Ancestral Puebloan Cultural Landmark

 
 
Welcome to Chimney Rock National Monument image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, July 9, 2020
1. Welcome to Chimney Rock National Monument
Inscription.  Learning About Our Past, Preserving Our Legacy
The extraordinary archaeological resources at Chimney Rock have helped illuminate the history of the ancestral Puebloans who lived here over a thousand years ago. They built structures from the valley floors to the mesa tops, including the highest ceremonial Great House in the Southwest.

They left behind clues of their livelihood in architecture, pottery, stone tools, and other artifacts that have been subjects of study since the 1920s. More recently, anthropologists working with tribes and pueblos of the southwest have strengthened our understanding of — and connections to — this site. But the more we learn, the more questions we have.

Chimney Rock was designated as a national monument in 2012 to preserve its spiritual, historic, and scientific resources.

Visit With Respect
Archaeological sites encompass irreplaceable pieces of our cultural heritage. Please help preserve the legacy of this special place and its link to the past.
• Please leave all food in your car. Crumbs attract rodents that tunnel and nest in sites, accelerating
Welcome to Chimney Rock National Monument Detail image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, July 9, 2020
2. Welcome to Chimney Rock National Monument Detail
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deterioration.
• Avoid stepping on walls, do not move rocks, and never remove pieces of pottery or other artifacts. In their original context, artifacts tell stories about the past. Out of context, artifacts can lose much of their meaning.
• Treat sites with respect — tribes and pueblos of the Southwest consider Chimney Rock to be part of their ancestral homelands and they have a deep spiritual connection to this site.

We invite you to experience Chimney Rock and find your own connection to this special place — a part of our shared national legacy.

Captions
Left: The Great Kiva — a special purpose ceremonial room — is the largest excavated single-room structure on the upper mesa.
Right: Above: Black-on-white pottery from Chimney Rock provides evidence of a connection to the Chaco culture. (Photo courtesy of Chimney Rock Interpretive Association.)
Left: A mano (smaller rock) and metate (larger base rock) was used to grind corn. This example is similar to those from Chimney Rock. (Photo Courtesy of the American Southwest Virtual Museum.)
 
Topics. This historical marker monument is listed in these topic lists: Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative Americans.
 
Location. 37° 10.504′ N, 107° 
Welcome to Chimney Rock National Monument image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, July 9, 2020
3. Welcome to Chimney Rock National Monument
Marker is on the right.
17.678′ W. Marker is near Pagosa Springs, Colorado, in Archuleta County. Marker is on Chimney Rock Road (Forest Road 617) east of State Highway 151, on the right when traveling west. Marker is located at entrance to Chimney Rock National Monument. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Pagosa Springs CO 81147, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. People and Place (here, next to this marker); Pit House Site (approx. half a mile away); The Great Kiva (approx. half a mile away); Chimney Rock Artifacts (approx. half a mile away).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 23, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 21, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 56 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 21, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 8, 2021