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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Wheeler in Wheeler County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Custer on the Sweetwater

 
 
Custer on the Sweetwater Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen Lowrey, July 25, 2020
1. Custer on the Sweetwater Marker
Inscription.  

Sweetwater creek was essential to millions of southern buffalo In a region known as the Comancheria. Plains Indians camped along this freshwater stream to seek shelter from harsh winters. As Anglos continued to settle the southern plains, the incompatible cultures fought for survival. On two separate occasions in 1868, members of the Cheyenne and Sioux tribes kidnapped two Anglo women from Kansas, Sarah White and Anna Brewster Morgan. George Armstrong Custer, who earned a reputation for flamboyant and fearless leadership during the Civil War, led the 7th cavalry and the 19th Kansas volunteers in an Indian removal winter campaign of 1868-69. During this campaign, Custer rescued Morgan and White.

On March 15, 1869, Custer's chief scout, Hard Rope, viewed a large herd of Indian ponies grazing. The Cheyenne village of 260 lodges lay below them on the banks of the Sweetwater. Hard Rope raced back to tell Custer. Aware that a fired shot would signal the execution of the two captured women, Custer proceeded ahead of his troops hoping to make a truce. The Cheyenne led Custer to a meeting with Rock Forehead
Custer on the Sweetwater Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen Lowrey, July 25, 2020
2. Custer on the Sweetwater Marker
(Medicine Arrows), the Cheyenne chief, and other head men of the tribe.

When a dozen Cheyenne arrived at Custer's camp to entertain and serenade the officers and chiefs, Custer ordered the detention of the principal chiefs present. Custer released one hostage to relay his demand of the unconditional surrender of the two women. On the third day, after intense negotiations, Custer gave an ultimatum that if the women were not released by sunset the following day, hostile activities would commence. Peace was achieved, and on March 19, 1869, Morgan and White were returned.
Marker is property of the State of Texas
 
Erected 2017 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 18814.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansWars, US Indian.
 
Location. 35° 29.327′ N, 100° 17.341′ W. Marker is in Wheeler, Texas, in Wheeler County. Marker is on US-83, on the right when traveling north. The marker is 3 miles north of 1st Street in Wheeler on US-83. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Wheeler TX 79096, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Quanah Parker Trail (approx. 3.1 miles away); Wheeler County Courthouse (approx. 3.2 miles away); Wheeler County
Sweetwater Ranch gate, just south of marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen Lowrey, July 25, 2020
3. Sweetwater Ranch gate, just south of marker
(approx. 3.2 miles away); Wheeler County Jail (approx. 3.2 miles away); The Millie Porter House (approx. 3˝ miles away); Wheeler Cemetery (approx. 4 miles away); Old Rock House (approx. 7.6 miles away); Mobeetie Cemetery (approx. 8.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wheeler.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 26, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 26, 2020, by Allen Lowrey of Amarillo, Texas. This page has been viewed 74 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 26, 2020, by Allen Lowrey of Amarillo, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 7, 2021