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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Fort Rice in Morton County, North Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Fort Rice

 
 
Fort Rice Marker image. Click for full size.
By Connor Olson, September 27, 2019
1. Fort Rice Marker
Inscription.  Fort Rice was a United States military post established to provide protection for white settlers who had just commenced to penetrate the territory of Dakota and as a military base for operations against hostile Indian tribes.
The post was established on July 11, 1864 by General Alfred H Sully. He traveled up the Missouri River with a large party of troops and left Colonel Daniel J. Dill in command of four companies of infantry and two companies of Calvary to build the Fort at the site selected. So he proceeded westward where the battle of Killdeer Mountains and the Battle of Badlands were fought with the hostile Sioux.
Fort Rice played in important part in the early history of North Dakota. It was from this post that Colonel Dill and 600 soldiers proceeded to the rescue of the Fisk expedition which was attacked by hostile Indians near Rhame, North Dakota, while enroute to the gold fields of Montana and Idaho.
in 1873 General George A. Custer arrived at Fort Rice with the Seventh Calvary and participated in the expedition to the Yellowstone River. In 1876 a small body of troops from Fort Rice accompanied to Custer expedition
Close-up of the marker image. Click for full size.
By Connor Olson, September 27, 2019
2. Close-up of the marker
to the Little Big Horn.
After the establishment of Fort Abraham Lincoln in 1872 and Fort Yates in 1878 Fort Rice was no longer needed. The post was abandoned and dismantled in 1878 and Fort Rice Military Reservation was turned over to the Interior Department by the War Department in 1884.
The site of Fort Rice was secured by the State Historical Society of North Dakota in 1913. The State Park Authorities sponsored WPA projects to restore and adequately mark the old fort buildings in order that the story of Fort Rice and the important part it played in North Dakota‘s history might be preserved.

Plat of Fort Rice Military Post

Dakota Territory showing sites of military posts
 
Erected 1962 by State Historical Society of North Dakota.
 
Topics. This memorial is listed in these topic lists: Forts and CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian.
 
Location. 46° 30.787′ N, 100° 35.02′ W. Marker is near Fort Rice, North Dakota, in Morton County. Memorial is on North Dakota Route 1806. Located at Fort Rice State Historic Site, on a stone kiosk. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Mandan ND 58554, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Founding of Fort Rice (within

Site of fort barracks. image. Click for full size.
By Connor Olson, September 27, 2019
3. Site of fort barracks.
shouting distance of this marker); Fort Rice After General Sully's Expeditions (within shouting distance of this marker); Archaeological Excavations of Houses (approx. 7.8 miles away); Village Fortifications and Human Conflict (approx. 7.8 miles away); Huff Indian Village State Historic Site (approx. 7.8 miles away); Huff Indian Village Dates to AD 1443-1465 (approx. 7.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  ND State History - Fort Rice State Historic Site. (Submitted on August 3, 2020.)
 
Map of forts in the Dakota Territory on marker. image. Click for full size.
By Connor Olson, September 27, 2019
4. Map of forts in the Dakota Territory on marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 7, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 1, 2020, by Connor Olson of Lemmon, South Dakota. This page has been viewed 51 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 1, 2020, by Connor Olson of Lemmon, South Dakota.   2, 3, 4. submitted on August 7, 2020, by Connor Olson of Lemmon, South Dakota. • Mark Hilton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 7, 2021