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Bath in Steuben County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Bath National Cemetery

 
 
Bath National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 29, 2020
1. Bath National Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  

Soldiers' and Sailors' Home
In 1872, the New York legislature passed an unfunded bill to create the New York Soldiers' and Sailors' Home. The Grand Army of the Republic, a Union Army veterans group, raised money to construct the first three buildings. The State Home served its first meal on Christmas Day 1878.

The campus grew to contain more than 100 structures on almost 400 acres. In 1906, the population reached 2,187. By 1928, the death rate of aging Civil War veterans reduced the resident population to 192.

[Illustration caption reads]
The New York Soldiers' and Sailors' Home, from the Home's letterhead, 1881.

In 1929, the federal government assumed responsibility for the facility and it became the Bath Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers. It was the last of eleven National Homes designated since 1865.

The National Homes were merged with the U.S. Veterans Bureau and Bureau of Pensions to form the Veterans Administration (now the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs) in 1930.

National Cemetery

[Photo caption reads]
Postcard

Bath National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 29, 2020
2. Bath National Cemetery Marker
view of the 1894 monument and cemetery, 1911.

The first burial was Pvt. William C. Terrell in 1879. By 1912, an estimated 4,225 Civil War veterans lay in the cemetery, including former members of U.S. Colored Troops. Among those interred here is Pvt. Robert Knox Sneden, who chronicled the Civil War in colorful drawings and maps.

Sneden served in the Army of the Potomac as a topographical engineer. In November 1863 he was captured and spent thirteen months in Confederate prisons, including Andersonville, Georgia. After his December 1864 release, the army discharged him. Sneden returned to New York City and compiled a memoir and scrapbook of images documenting his military service. He entered the State Home in 1904, and died there in 1918 (Section J, Row 11, Grave 14).

[Illustration caption reads]
Rebel Battery in the Potomac River, 1862, by Pvt. Robert Knox Sneden.

Medal of Honor Recipients

Five Civil War recipients of the Medal of Honor are buried in the cemetery. First bestowed in 1863, it is the highest award for military valor in the U.S. Armed Services. For acts above and beyond the call of duty, 1,522 individuals who served in the Civil War received the medal.

[Photo caption reads]
Civil War Army Medal of Honor.

Pvt. George M. Grueb, 158th New York Infantry, was

Cpl George M. Grueb image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 29, 2020
3. Cpl George M. Grueb
Grueb received the Medal of Honor while serving in the U.S. Army, Company E, 158th New York Infantry, for gallantry at Chapin’s Farm, Virginia, September 29, 1864. Grueb died in 1893 and is buried in Section A, Row 2, Site 3. From Bath National Cemetery website
commended for gallantry at the Battle of Chaffin’s Farm, Virginia, September 29, 1864 (Section A, Row 2, Grave 3). [Grueb's headstone lists rank as Cpl.]

Sgt. John Kiggins, 149th New York Infantry, saved men from friendly fire at Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, November 24, 1863 (Section H, Row 32, Grave 9).

Pvt. George Ladd, 22nd New York Cavalry, captured a Confederate color guard, flag, and horse at Waynesboro, Virginia, March 2, 1865 (Section C, Row 6, Grave 6).

Sgt. Charles E. Morse, 62nd New York Infantry, seized the colors from a wounded sergeant and, though soon injured, carried them during the battle of the Wilderness, Virginia, May 5, 1864 (Section J, Row 4, Grave 24).

Seaman James Roberts, U.S.S. Agawam, was among the crew of a powder boat detonated near Fort Fisher, North Carolina, December 23, 1864 (Section I, Row 26, Grave 2).
 
Erected by National Cemetery Administration.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesCharity & Public WorkPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the National Cemeteries series list.
 
Location. 42° 20.842′ N, 77° 21.033′ W. Marker is in Bath, New York, in Steuben

Private James Roberts image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 29, 2020
4. Private James Roberts
Roberts received the Medal of Honor while serving in the U.S. Navy for actions on board the U.S.S. Agawam, December 23,1864. Roberts also served in the U.S. Army, Company K, 8th Connecticut Infantry. Private Roberts died in 1908 and is buried in Section I, Row 26, Site 2. From Bath National Cemetery website
County. Marker is along San Juan Avenue, on the left near the Bath National Cemetery administration building. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bath NY 14810, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. War Memorial (here, next to this marker); A National Cemetery System (here, next to this marker); First Marine Division War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Civil War Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Address by President Lincoln (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bath Theatre (approx. 1.6 miles away); John Magee House (approx. 1.7 miles away); Worker’s Memorial (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bath.
 
Also see . . .  Bath National Cemetery. (Submitted on August 2, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Bath National Cemetery Entrance Sign image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 29, 2020
5. Bath National Cemetery Entrance Sign
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 2, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 2, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 62 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 2, 2020, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photos of the other Medal of Honor recipient headstones. • Can you help?
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Mar. 1, 2021