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Mount Rainier in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 5

 
 
Original Federal Boundary Stone NE 5 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
1. Original Federal Boundary Stone NE 5 Marker
Inscription.  
Original Federal Boundary Stone
District of Columbia
Placed 1791-1792
Protected by Constitution Chapter
Daughters of the American Revolution
1916

 
Erected 1916 by Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Political Subdivisions. In addition, it is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), and the Original Federal Boundary Stones series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1916.
 
Location. 38° 56.665′ N, 76° 58.501′ W. Marker is in Mount Rainier, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Eastern Avenue, 0.1 miles north of Varnum Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4609 Eastern Avenue, Mount Rainier MD 20712, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Very Rev. Godfrey Schilling, O.F.M. (approx. ¾ mile away in District of Columbia); Very Rev. Charles A. Vissani, O.F.M. (approx. ¾ mile away in District of Columbia); Erected to the Memory of the Very Reverend Commissaries
Original Federal Boundary Stone NE 5 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
2. Original Federal Boundary Stone NE 5 Marker
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(approx. ¾ mile away in District of Columbia); a different marker also named Very Rev. Charles A. Vissani, O.F.M. (approx. ¾ mile away in District of Columbia); Franciscan Monastery (approx. ¾ mile away in District of Columbia); Corinthian Capital (approx. ¾ mile away in District of Columbia); Carlo Angelo Facchina (approx. ¾ mile away in District of Columbia); St. Joseph's Seminary (approx. ¾ mile away in District of Columbia).
 
Regarding Original Federal Boundary Stone, District of Columbia, Northeast 5. This marker is known as the North East No.5 marker (NE 5), as it is the fifth marker from the North marker along the Northeast boundary between the District of Columbia and Maryland.
 
Also see . . .  Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia. (Submitted on April 3, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
 
Northeast Side of Stone image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
3. Northeast Side of Stone
Facing the state of Maryland.
Northwest Side of Stone image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
4. Northwest Side of Stone
Southeast Side of Stone image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
5. Southeast Side of Stone
Southwest Side of Stone image. Click for full size.
Photographed By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
6. Southwest Side of Stone
Facing the "Jurisdiction of the United States".
Northeast 5 Near Queens Chapel Road image. Click for full size.
Internet Archive
7. Northeast 5 Near Queens Chapel Road
“N. E. No. 5 is about one fourth of a mile from any travelled road and stands in the edge of a truck garden owned by Mr. Lewis Strckfus on a part of the old Klein estate. It is southwest from the Queen 's Chapel road, near the point where the C. & P. Telephone Company have established a repair station for long distance work. As will be seen from our illustration, which also shows Mr. Strckfus' daughter, Katy, the stone leans at an angle of 45 degrees; otherwise this stone is in good condition and the inscription is easily read. One wonders when and how, under the existing conditions, this massive stone more than two feet under ground, should thus change its position. One of the old residents assured us from his personal observation that for at least thirty years it had been in that same position.

More than likely some tremendous storm of years gone by like that which destroyed Minot's Ledge Lighthouse in 1851 or the great September gale of 1869, swelled the little ditch on the edge of which it stands, to a powerful, rushing stream, and in its course, washed away enough of the sand to topple the stone.” -- Fred Woodward.
From A Ramble Along the Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia with a Camera by Fred E. Woodward, 1907, Plate XIV.
Dedication Ceremonies<br>at District of Columbia Milestone No. 5<br>On October 20, 1917 image. Click for full size.
Internet Archive
8. Dedication Ceremonies
at District of Columbia Milestone No. 5
On October 20, 1917
by Constitution Chapter (DAR), District of Columbia.
From Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine, Vol. LII, No. 4, April, 1918.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 12, 2021. It was originally submitted on February 4, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,522 times since then and 18 times this year. Last updated on August 15, 2020, by Roberto Bernate of Arlington, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 4, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   7, 8. submitted on April 9, 2021, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.

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May. 16, 2022