Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Early Moves to Battle

"The fire of battle veritably flashing in his eyes."

 

— The Third Battle of Winchester (September 19, 1864) —

 
Early Moves to Battle Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jay Randall Richardson, August 21, 2020
1. Early Moves to Battle Marker
Inscription.  
(sidebar)
On September 18, 1864, Confederate Gen. Jubal Early, commander of Confederate forces in the Shenandoah Valley, was in Martinsburg, West Virginia, 23 miles north of here, with half of his army. While there, he learned that Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant had traveled to Charlestown, West Virginia, to meet with Ge. Philip H. Sheridan, commander of Union forces in the Valley.

For Early, the news was disastrous. Grant's visit promised aggressive action, and Sheridan's much-larger army was only 10 miles east of Winchester — in prime position to move on the city, destroy the remaining Confederate force there, and cut off Early's retreat. Fortunately for Early, Union delays on the morning of September 19 gave him just enough time to hurry the rest of his army back to Winchester.

Confederate soldiers swarmed through the fields around you as they raced to block the Federal advance. Although Sheridan had taken him by surprise, Early worked fervently to prevent a complete disaster.

Reaching the battlefield, he galloped up to some Confederate batteries and shouted, "Pour it into 'em- give 'em
Third Winchester Battlefield Park image. Click for full size.
By Jay Randall Richardson, August 21, 2020
2. Third Winchester Battlefield Park
hell — God damn their blue-bellied souls..." With shells exploding around them and Union infantry approaching, Early remained "cool as a cucumber" with "the fire of battle veritable flashing in his eyes."

Early succeeded in stopping Sheridan's initial attack, helping to stave off disaster. And what could have been a quick and easy Union victory turned into a day-long struggle — the largest battle ever fought in the Valley.

(sidebar)
The woodlot that you are standing in is the same woodlot — in the same shape — as the woodlot that was here during the battle. The trees around you are the descendants of the trees that stood here in 1864.

This sign made possible through funds donated by the Millbrook High School Cross Country Team
 
Erected 2020 by The Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 39° 12.544′ N, 78° 7.608′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from Redbud Road (Scenic Virginia Route 661) 0.9 miles east of Martinsburg Pike (U.S. 11), on the right when traveling east. Located along the Third Battle of Winchester Trail. Touch for map
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
. Marker is at or near this postal address: 541 Redbud Rd, Winchester VA 22603, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Third Battle of Winchester (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); "Like A Thousand Bricks" (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester (about 600 feet away); The Second Battle of Kernstown (about 600 feet away); The Battle of Rutherford's Farm (about 600 feet away); The Second Battle of Winchester (about 600 feet away); The First Battle of Winchester (about 600 feet away); The First Battle of Kernstown (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
Also see . . .  Third Winchester Battlefield – Redbud Run Trails. The Shenandoah Valley Battlefields National Historic District (Submitted on August 21, 2020.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 31, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 21, 2020, by Jay Richardson of Martinsburg, West Virginia. This page has been viewed 132 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 21, 2020, by Jay Richardson of Martinsburg, West Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Feb. 25, 2021