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Corinth in Alcorn County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

War in a Railroad Town

 
 
War in a Railroad Town Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, August 23, 2020
1. War in a Railroad Town Marker
Inscription.  For six months in 1862, the fight to control Corinth’s crucial railroad crossover made the young town second only to Richmond in military importance.

Noting her location at the junction of the two longest railroads in the South, General Ulysses S. Grant called Corinth “the great strategic point in the West.”

Confederate Secretary of War Leroy P. Walker concurred with this assessment, arguing the rail line through Corinth “must be defended at all hazards. These roads constitute the vertebrae of the Confederacy.”

In the weeks following the battle of Shiloh, five armies and over 200,000 men struggled here to possess the vital railroad junction.

During the siege, General P.G.T. Beauregard, commander of all Confederate forces in Corinth, established his headquarters in the Duncan House. Beauregard understood the stakes, predicting “If defeated here we lose the Mississippi Valley and probably our cause.” However, on May 30, 1862, advancing Federals forced the southern leader to vacate the city.

In January 1864, when Union forces also abandoned
War in a Railroad Town Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, August 23, 2020
2. War in a Railroad Town Marker
Marker is located second from left.
the city, the prosperity promised four years earlier with the arrival of the Memphis & Charleston and Mobile & Ohio railroads had been replaced by war’s death and desolation.

Corinth’s place in Civil War history had been secured, but at a terrible cost…

(captions)
The Corinth railroad depot and the Tishomingo Hotel. (Image shows residents of the Corinth Contraband Camp awaiting transfer to a new camp near Memphis, December, 1836. Collection of Van Hedges

Background image: The Corinth railroad depot and the Tishomingo Hotel. Note the photography studios on the left of the hotel. Collection of Van Hedges

View of Battery Williams and Battery Robinette. Collection of Van Hedges

General Pierre G.T. Beauregard organized and led the defense of Corinth in May, 1862. Photo: Library of Congress.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 34° 56.304′ N, 88° 31.248′ W. Marker is in Corinth, Mississippi, in Alcorn County. Marker is at the intersection of Polk Street and East Linden Street, on the right when traveling north on Polk Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Corinth MS 38834, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Steps Toward Citizenship for a Newly Free People (here, next to this marker); The Historic Corinth Railroad Junction
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(here, next to this marker); “All of our trains are ordered to Corinth…” (here, next to this marker); Raining death and destruction from afar… (here, next to this marker); “A fearful hand-to-hand fight (here, next to this marker); “I was in the battle of Shiloh (here, next to this marker); Staff Officers (a few steps from this marker); Strategic Importance of Corinth (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Corinth.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Corinth in the Civil War: At the Crossroads of History. (Submitted on August 26, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 26, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 52 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 26, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Jan. 25, 2021