Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Corinth in Alcorn County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

“A fearful hand-to-hand fight

 
 
“A fearful hand-to-hand fight Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, August 23, 2020
1. “A fearful hand-to-hand fight Marker
Inscription.  “A fearful hand-to-hand fight was raging in the heart of the town – around the railroad depot, the Tishomingo Hotel, the Corinth House, and even in the yard around the headquarters of General Rosecrans, the old Duncan homestead.”
– Private Thomas D. Duncan

The Duncan House served as Union headquarters during the October 1862 Battle of Corinth. On October 3rd, fighting began over five miles to the northwest, and by sunset hostilities ended less than a half-mile away. General Rosecrans spent most of the night positioning his troops for the next day’s contest, returning to the Duncan House at 3:00 a.m. An hour later he was awakened by cannon fire.

During a brief Confederate breakthrough on the second day of the battle, fighting raged all about the home, and as far south as the vital railroad crossing. Major General Earl Van Dorn’s post battle report describes “a hand-to-hand contest” enacted “in the very yard of General Rosecrans’ headquarters and in the streets of the town.”

Lieutenant Thomas Tobin of Hoxton’s Tennessee Battery, captured early in
“A fearful hand-to-hand fight Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, August 23, 2020
2. “A fearful hand-to-hand fight Marker
Marker is located second from right.
the morning, witnessed the battle from within the Union lines: “Our troops penetrated to the Corinth House and the Tishomingo House and to the square in front of General Bragg’s old headquarters [the Verandah House] and into the yard of General Rosecrans headquarters.” The Cincinnati Commercial later described the serious nature of this struggle at the Duncan House: “Seven rebels were killed within the little enclosure in front of the General’s cottage.”

Reserves from the east and west sides of the tow converged to turn the tide of battle. The Confederates were driven from the town and the Duncan House was restored to Union control.

(captions)
Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn, commander of the Confederate Army of West Tennessee, during the Battle of Corinth.

Maj. Gen. Wm S. Rosecrans. He and Van Dorn were cadets in the West Point class of 1842.

Dead in front of Battery Robinett. All images from the collection of Van Hodges

Background image – “The Key to Corinth,” by Keith Rocco.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 34° 56.303′ N, 88° 31.249′ W. Marker is in Corinth, Mississippi, in Alcorn County. Marker is at the intersection
Gen. William S. Rosecrans, U.S.A. image. Click for full size.
3. Gen. William S. Rosecrans, U.S.A.
of Polk Street and East Linden Street, on the right when traveling north on Polk Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Corinth MS 38834, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. “All of our trains are ordered to Corinth…” (here, next to this marker); The Historic Corinth Railroad Junction (here, next to this marker); “I was in the battle of Shiloh (here, next to this marker); War in a Railroad Town (here, next to this marker); Raining death and destruction from afar… (here, next to this marker); First Steps Toward Citizenship for a Newly Free People (here, next to this marker); Strategic Importance of Corinth (here, next to this marker); Staff Officers (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Corinth.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Gen. Earl Van Dorn, C.S.A. image. Click for full size.
4. Gen. Earl Van Dorn, C.S.A.
The Duncan House image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, August 23, 2020
5. The Duncan House
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 26, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 52 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 26, 2020, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Feb. 28, 2021