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Lubbock in Lubbock County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Colonel T. S. Lubbock / Texas in the Civil War

 
 
Colonel T. S. Lubbock Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, April 28, 2014
1. Colonel T. S. Lubbock Marker
Inscription.  
County named for Texas Confederate
Colonel T. S. Lubbock
1817 – 1862

South Carolinian. Came to Texas 1835. Indian fighter, soldier, businessman. Member Secession Convention. Went to Virginia hoping to fight for South in first battle of war. Commended for valuable volunteer service as scout and reporting enemy troop positions in First Battle of Manassas. Sent to Texas to raise regiment for Army of Virginia. Upon organization, the 8th Texas Cavalry—famed Terry's Rangers—elected him Lieutenant Colonel. Went to Kentucky. When Terry was killed, Rangers unanimously elected him Colonel. Ill with typhoid fever, he died soon after. Buried Glenwood Cemetery, Houston.

Reverse
Texas
In the Civil War

1861 – 1865

Texas made an all-out effort for the Confederacy after a 3 to 1 popular vote for secession. 90,000 troops, famed for mobility and daring, fought on every battlefront. A 2,000 mile frontier and coast were successfully defended from Union troop invasion and savage Indians. Texas was the storehouse of Western Confederacy.
Texas in the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, April 28, 2014
2. Texas in the Civil War Marker
Wagon trains laden with cotton- life blood of the South- crossed the state to Mexico to trade for medical supplies, clothing, military supplies. State and private industry produced guns, ammunition, wagons, pots, kettles, leather goods, salt, hospital supplies. Wives, sons, daughters, slaves provided corn, cotton, cloth, cattle, hogs, cured meats to the Army, giving much, keeping little for themselves.
 
Erected 1964 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 966.)
 
Topics. This memorial is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 33° 35.104′ N, 101° 50.712′ W. Marker is in Lubbock, Texas, in Lubbock County. Memorial is on Texas Avenue south of Main Street, on the left when traveling south. Marker is at the west entrance of the Lubbock County Court House. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 904 Broadway Street, Lubbock TX 79401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Tribute to Cotton (here, next to this marker); Mackenzie Scout Trail (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lubbock Post Office and Federal Building (about 500 feet away); Carlock Building (about 600 feet away); First Methodist Church of Lubbock (approx. 0.3 miles away); F W & D South Plains Railway Depot
Colonel T. S. Lubbock / Texas in the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, April 28, 2014
3. Colonel T. S. Lubbock / Texas in the Civil War Marker
(approx. half a mile away); The McCartney Oak (approx. half a mile away); Buddy Holly (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lubbock.
 
Lubbock County Court House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, April 28, 2014
4. Lubbock County Court House
Colonel T. S. Lubbock / Texas in the Civil War Marker is just to the left of the entrance.
Lubbock County Courthouse (<b><i>wide view; marker visible bottom left</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 16, 2016
5. Lubbock County Courthouse (wide view; marker visible bottom left)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 29, 2020. It was originally submitted on May 9, 2014. This page has been viewed 774 times since then and 16 times this year. Last updated on August 29, 2020, by Allen Lowrey of Amarillo, Texas. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 9, 2014, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   5. submitted on March 20, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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