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Near Cordova in Talbot County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Champion for Equality

 
 
A Champion for Equality Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, September 2, 2020
1. A Champion for Equality Marker
Inscription.  Empowered by a hunger for learning and a thirst for liberty, Frederick Douglass fled from slavery as a young adult in Baltimore and dedicated his life to ending the injustices of oppression. His work impacted the world, and the fire of his commitment to equality still burns in others today.

Douglass used ht power of his sharp mind, provocative speech, and inspired writing to motivate other people into action. He became an internationally known abolitionist leader, edited his North Star newspaper, ran an Underground Railroad station, crusaded for women's rights, recruited Black soldiers for the Union during the Civil War, and advocated for freedom.

Explore his life story beyond the Eastern Shore of Maryland and follow in his footsteps.

"I am not a American slave, but a man, and as such, am bound to use my powers for the welfare of the whole human brotherhood.
Frederick Douglass letter from Montrose, Scotland,to William Lloyd Garrison, February 26, 1846."

Self-educated, Frederick Douglass escaped slavery in Maryland and demonstrated through living example that enslaved people held the capacity to function as independent American

Group of three markers. image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, September 2, 2020
2. Group of three markers.
citizens. He became a best-selling author and orator, an advisor to President Abraham Lincoln, U.S. Marshal for the District of Columbia and Minister to Haiti.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Abolition & Underground RRAfrican Americans.
 
Location. 38° 54.677′ N, 75° 57.004′ W. Marker is near Cordova, Maryland, in Talbot County. Marker is on Maryland Route 303, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cordova MD 21625, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Forging Freedom from Places of Bondage (here, next to this marker); The Beloved Tuckahoe Home of Frederick Douglass (here, next to this marker); Honoring an American Hero (within shouting distance of this marker); Frederick Douglass (approx. half a mile away); St. Paul’s Episcopal Church (approx. half a mile away); Adkins Arboretum (approx. 3.1 miles away); St. Joseph’s Church (approx. 3.6 miles away); Tuckahoe Neck Meeting House (approx. 5.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cordova.
 
A Champion for Equality Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, September 2, 2020
3. A Champion for Equality Marker
Visit President Street Station in Baltimore, where Douglass escaped slavery in 1838 at age 20 by disguising himself as a sailor and boarding a train headed to Philadelophi. The station now houses the Baltimore Civil War Museum.
A Champion for Equality Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, September 2, 2020
4. A Champion for Equality Marker
Experience the remarkable legacy of Frederick Douglass at the Banneker-Douglass Museum, Maryland's repository of African American history and culture. The museum is housed in the former Mount Moriah African American Methodist Episcopal Church in Annapolis
A Champion for Equality Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, September 2, 2020
5. A Champion for Equality Marker
Frederick Douglass Isaac Myers Maritime Park chronicles the saga of Douglass's life in Baltimore. Tnere, he taught himself to read, developed a trade as a ship caulker, met his wife Anna Murray, and eventually escaped to freedom.
A Champion for Equality Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Pfingsten, September 2, 2020
6. A Champion for Equality Marker
Frederick Douglass spent his last 1 years living at Cedar Hill in the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Today, you can take a guided tour of his home at the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 4, 2020, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 59 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 4, 2020, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.
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