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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Spotsylvania Courthouse in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Civil War Veterans at rest in Zion's Cemetery

[Zion Methodist Church]

 
 
Civil War Veterans at rest in Zion's Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 18, 2020
1. Civil War Veterans at rest in Zion's Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  
This cemetery is the final resting place for six Civil War veterans. Only three of the six have military style headstones.

Charles Chewning, 9th VA. Cavalry. Private Chewning received a sabre wound to his left thigh at Second Manassas in 1862. Following a lengthy recovery, he eventually was able to stand and walk, but was unfit to return for cavalry service. He returned to his "beloved 9th Virginia Cavalry" as a clerk and surrendered at Appomattox.

Thomas Addison Harris, 30th Virginia Infantry and 9th. VA Cavalry. When his enlistment expired in the 30th Virginia, Harris joined the 9th Virginia Cavalry. "Quick to volunteer, and at the forefront of action", were remarks bestowed on Harris by his commanding officer, Colonel Beal. In March 1865, a woman attending her sick slave and the slave's two daughters were trapped inside a house near Dinwiddie Courthouse, while fighting raged around them. General Fitz Lee asked for volunteers to rescue the four trapped victims. Harris stepped forward and was chosen with three of his trooper friends. Harris saved one of the victims, but he received a Union Minnie-ball in his leg in
Civil War Veterans at rest in Zion's Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 18, 2020
2. Civil War Veterans at rest in Zion's Cemetery Marker
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the process. It ended the war for Harris. He returned to Spotsylvania to farm, and served as Superintendent to the Poor, Sherriff and Clerk of the Court (one of four Zion members to hold that position).

Henry A. Carner, 6th VA Cavalry. Private Carner, the son of a Methodist Minister, enlisted late in the war in 1864 and surrendered at Appomattox.

Charles Henry Hudson, little is known of Hudson's service. But he served in the Staunton Hill Light Artillery, (Virginia CSA). The Staunton Hill Artillery was primarily responsible for guarding the costal water-ways from Norfolk to Charleston.

Joseph Patrick Henry (J.P.H.) Crismond, 36th VA Cavalry. Like Hudson, little is also known of Crismond's service, but his obituary stated that he also served in the 9th. Virginia Cavalry. He was wounded near Woodstock VA late in the war. After the war, Crismond returned home and farmed for several years, and then worked as a merchant. Crismond underwent an examination and at the seventy-ninth session of the Virginia conference held in Norfolk in late 1873, Crismond was appointed as a supply minister for the Spotsylvania Circuit. The records of Tabernacle Methodist Church indicate that Crismond served as a preacher there during 1873-74. In November 1876, he was elected as an ordained deacon as the eighty-second session of the conference held in Richmond. His growing
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popularity vaulted his move into politics. In 1881, he was elected clerk of the court, a position he would hold until 1903.

Private [unreadable], 2nd. New York Heavy Artillery. Little is known of Private [unreadable], but his regiment fought in [unreadable] Spotsylvania and Fredericksburg. He was born in Canada and moved to Bergan N.Y. by 1860 [unreadable] in a house fire in Spotsylvania in 1910.

Seven of Zion's early ministers also served in the Confederate Army, two as Chaplains.
 
Erected by Zion Methodist Church.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & ReligionWar, US Civil. A significant historical month for this entry is March 1865.
 
Location. Marker has been reported unreadable. 38° 11.63′ N, 77° 35.201′ W. Marker is in Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker is at the intersection of Courthouse Road (Virginia Route 208) and Massaponax Church Road (County Road 608), on the right when traveling south on Courthouse Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8701 Courthouse Rd, Spotsylvania VA 22553, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Zion Methodist Church (a few steps from this marker); Pastor's Office (within shouting distance of this marker); Slave Entrance (within shouting distance
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of this marker); Education in Spotsylvania County (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Stubbs School (about 500 feet away); The Good Hope Colored School (about 500 feet away); Forever young, Forever in our hearts (about 800 feet away); Batter Up: Spotsylvania Yellow Jackets (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Spotsylvania Courthouse.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 12, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 18, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 60 times since then and 8 times this year. Last updated on September 11, 2020, by Bradley Owen of Morgantown, West Virginia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 18, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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Mar. 9, 2021