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Tinbridge Hill in Lynchburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Removal of Federal Dead

 
 
Removal of Federal Dead Marker (<i>panel 1</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, October 1, 2015
1. Removal of Federal Dead Marker (panel 1)
Inscription.  
(panel 1)
"The work of removing the bodies of Federal soldiers, who died here during the war, was commenced on yesterday. Their remains will be taken from this place to City Point for re-interment."
Lynchburg Daily Virginian
Saturday, 13 October, 1866

(panel 2)
The Federal Government in the removal of their dead from this place began at what I call № 1 in 1st line 1st lot and numbered the coffin no’s proceeding numerically in the row and going back to foot of № 1 calling it II and so on through the squares.
Oct 14th, 1866
G. A. Diuguid
So that Capt. Edmond Keys Co. 13 716th thus would be no 13.

Notation by George A. Diuguid in the Soldier Book Record of Burials, Confederate Section, Old City Cemetery
May 19, 1861-September 19, 1869


(panel 3)
Lynchburg Daily Virginian,
Wednesday, October 17, 1866


"On the slope of the hill just below the old Methodist Graveyard, a group of half a dozen or more white tents can be seen by passers along the Dirt bridge road. Piled up around them are a great number of neat but unpainted boxes. Over in
Removal of Federal Dead Marker (<i>panel 2</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, October 1, 2015
2. Removal of Federal Dead Marker (panel 2)
the graveyard at one of the lower corners a party of men can be seen at work. This is a detachment of the Burial Corps of the United States, and the boxes are coffins to contain the remains of the Federal soldiers who were buried there. Those remains are to be taken with pious care to a national cemetery for sepulture, where monuments will be erected, flowers planted and every fitting demonstration of honor to the dead be paid. That is all right enough; a greatful country should honor those who died beneath its flag.

Nearby are long rows of unkept and unhonored Confederate graves. Not even a wooden inclosure protects them from the tramp of the beasts of the field. They are exposed to desecration, and bear no token of love. The flowers which were tenderly placed upon them in May last have withered and turned to dust. But this state of neglect, we rejoice to know, is not long to remain.

Simultaneously with the operations just mentioned, the ladies of Lynchburg were exerting themselves to procure the means to inclose and to adorn those graves. —Their hands, ever ready for good works, were busying themselves in behalf of an object so tender in all its associations.— Their tribunitial labors are now ended. Feast, and Fair, and Tableaux, and Concert are over, and the means necessary to complete the sacred work has been obtained."

(panel 4)
The
Removal of Federal Dead Marker (<i>panel 3</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, October 1, 2015
3. Removal of Federal Dead Marker (panel 3)
final resting place for the Union soldiers removed from this cemetery is:
Poplar Grove National Cemetery
Dinwiddie County
Petersburg, Virginia

For detailed information locating specific graves there, contact:
Petersburg National Battlefield Visitor Center
1539 Hickory Hill
Petersburg, Virginia 23804
(804) 732-3531
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 37° 24.932′ N, 79° 9.414′ W. Marker is in Tinbridge Hill in Lynchburg, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Taylor Street and 4th Street when traveling north. Marker is located within the Old City Cemetery grounds, about 1/10 mile north of 4th Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 401 Taylor Street, Lynchburg VA 24501, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Confederate Memorial Arch (here, next to this marker); Lucy Mina Otey and the Ladie’s Relief Hospital (here, next to this marker); Crippled Corps and V.M.I. Cadets Form Inner Defenses in Old City Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); The Confederate Section (a few steps from this marker); Women of Lynchburg's Confederate Hospitals (a few steps from this marker); Lynchburg, Virginia
Removal of Federal Dead Marker (<i>panel 4</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, October 1, 2015
4. Removal of Federal Dead Marker (panel 4)
(a few steps from this marker); Lynchburg’s Confederate Surgeons (a few steps from this marker); Confederate Smallpox Memorial (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tinbridge Hill.
 
Also see . . .  Poplar Grove National Cemetery (Wikipedia). In 1866, Lt. Colonel James Moore began his survey of the Petersburg area to locate land for a National Cemetery. Eventually, a farm just south of the city was chosen, and work began to move approximately 5,000 Union soldiers from nearly 100 separate burial sites around Petersburg. Bodies were moved from nine Virginia counties, reaching as far west as Lynchburg, Virginia. About 100 men comprised the "burial corps." With ten army wagons, forty mules, and twelve saddle horses, the burial corps worked for three years until 1869. In that time they reinterred 6,718 remains, of which only 2,139 bodies were positively identified. (Submitted on September 22, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Removal of Federal Dead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, October 1, 2015
5. Removal of Federal Dead Marker
Confederate Memorial Arch image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, October 1, 2015
6. Confederate Memorial Arch
(marker visible in right foreground)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 22, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 21, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 51 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 22, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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Jan. 18, 2021