Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Nacogdoches in Nacogdoches County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Old Stone Fort

 
 
Old Stone Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, September 1, 2018
1. Old Stone Fort Marker
Inscription.  

Stones recovered from a razed 18th century structure form the walls of this historic replica building. The stone house stood originally near the intersection of El Camino Real and La Calle del Norte (present Main at Fredonia), and was built by Don Antonio Gil Y'Barbo circa 1788-91. Because he was a military and civic leader, his home also served as an unofficial government building. Y'Barbo sold the property in 1805, and over the next century, owners and tenants used the building as a home, grocery store, restaurant, offices, courthouse, cobbler shop, jail, military barracks, saloon, and as a fortification during three filibustering expeditions and periodic raids by Native Americans. Sam Houston had his first law office in Texas in the building in 1833. The building became commonly known as "the Old Stone Fort" by the late 1870s, when proprietors began advertising in the Nacogdoches News a saloon and billiards room at the location.

The landmark structure was demolished in 1902. Citizens used the original stones first in a memorial building on Washington Square, and again for a historically accurate replica built on the Stephen
The Old Stone Fort Marker is the first marker from the left. image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, September 1, 2018
2. The Old Stone Fort Marker is the first marker from the left.
F. Austin State Teachers College campus in 1936.

Y'barbo's stone house was an important example of 18th century residential architecture, with French and Spanish Colonial influences-exterior doors for each room, stairs on the gallery porch and fireplaces in each interior room. The stones are from a formation known as Weches Glauconite, a sedimentary rock containing iron clay minerals. Sun-dried adobe blocks formed the interior walls. Window sills, casements and beams were of hand-hewn Black Walnut.
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1962
Marker is property of the State of Texas

 
Erected 1962 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 9393.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Forts or CastlesHispanic AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, Texas Independence.
 
Location. 31° 37.155′ N, 94° 38.928′ W. Marker is in Nacogdoches, Texas, in Nacogdoches County. Marker is at the intersection of Alumni Drive and Griffith Boulevard, on the right when traveling north on Alumni Drive. The Old Stone Fort and markers are located on the Stephen F. Austin University campus. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1808 Alumni Drive, Nacogdoches TX 75961, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this
Front view of the Old Stone Fort image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, September 1, 2018
3. Front view of the Old Stone Fort
marker. Stone Fort Museum (here, next to this marker); Ancient Paths (a few steps from this marker); Stephen F. Austin State Teachers College During World War II (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of the Home of Thomas J. Rusk (approx. ¼ mile away); Alton W. Birdwell (approx. 0.3 miles away); Site of the Home of Juan Antonio Padilla (approx. 0.6 miles away); Westminster Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.6 miles away); La Calle Real del Norte (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Nacogdoches.
 
Also see . . .  Old Stone Fort History. TSHA Texas State Historical Association (Submitted on September 28, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas.) 
 
An additional 1936 Old Stone Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Hulse, September 1, 2018
4. An additional 1936 Old Stone Fort Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 28, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 28, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 28, 2020, by James Hulse of Medina, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Jan. 21, 2021