Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Stevenson Ranch in Los Angeles County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

First Commercial Oil Well In California

Pico #4

 
 
Pico #4 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, January 30, 2018
1. Pico #4 Marker
Inscription.  
On this site stands CSO-4 (Pico #4), California's first commerically productive well. It was spudded in early 1876, under the direction of Demetrius G. Scofield, later to become first president of Standard Oil Company of California, and was completed at a depth of 300 feet on September 26, 1876, for an initial flow of 30 barrels of oil a day.

Later in the same year, the well was deepened to 600 feet, using what was perhaps the first steam rig employed in oil well drilling in California. Upon this second completion, it produced at a rate of 150 barrels a day, and is still producing after seventy-seven years.

The success of this well prompted formation of the Pacific Coast Oil Company, a predecessor of Standard Oil Company of California, and led to the construction of the state's first refinery nearby. It was not only the discovery well of the Newhall Field, but was, indeed, a powerful stimulus to the subsequent development of the California Petroleum Industry.
 
Erected 1953 by Standard Oil Company of California, and Petroleum Production Pioneers Inc. (Marker Number 516.)
Remains of Well, and Markers image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, January 30, 2018
2. Remains of Well, and Markers
Click or scan to see
this page online

 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesParks & Recreational Areas. In addition, it is included in the California Historical Landmarks, and the National Historic Landmarks series lists.
 
Location. 34° 22.219′ N, 118° 37.759′ W. Marker is near Stevenson Ranch, California, in Los Angeles County. Marker can be reached from Pico Canyon Road, 4½ miles west of Interstate 5. Walk the last 1.5 miles. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Stevenson Ranch CA 91381, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mentryville (approx. 1.2 miles away); Pioneer Oil Refinery (approx. 3.8 miles away); Oak of the Golden Dream (approx. 3.8 miles away); a different marker also named Oak of the Golden Dream (approx. 4.7 miles away); Rancho San Francisco (approx. 5 miles away); The Ridge Route (approx. 5.3 miles away); American Bison (approx. 5.7 miles away); William J. Johnston Jr. (approx. 5.8 miles away).
 
More about this marker. To visit the marker, drive to the west end of Pico Cyn Rd, pay to park at Mentryville, then walk 1½ miles up the canyon on the paved trail. Pico #4 is on the right, before the pavement ends.
 
Regarding First Commercial Oil Well In California. After producing oil for 114 years, the well shut down in 1990. This is California Historical Landmark No. 516.
 
Related markers.
Oil Well, before it was shut down image. Click for full size.
circa 1980
3. Oil Well, before it was shut down
Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  Pico #4 information and photos. Historic oil drilling equipment on display in this area. (Submitted on January 31, 2018.) 
 
Additional keywords. Santa Clarita, Mentryville, Pioneer Oil Refinery, Pico No. 4
 
National Historic Landmark image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, January 30, 2018
4. National Historic Landmark
Remains of a Jackline Plant on display. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, January 30, 2018
5. Remains of a Jackline Plant on display.
Historic display. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Craig Baker, January 30, 2018
6. Historic display.
Half way between Mentryville and Pico #4 is the oil company picnic area Johnson Park, with displays of historic drilling equipment, not maintained and falling apart.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 21, 2021. It was originally submitted on January 31, 2018. This page has been viewed 437 times since then and 56 times this year. Last updated on October 11, 2020, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 31, 2018, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   3. submitted on February 28, 2018, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   4. submitted on January 31, 2018, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   5, 6. submitted on February 5, 2018, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=157684

Paid Advertisements
 
 

May. 25, 2022