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Dallas in Dallas County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Women's Suffrage in Dallas County

 
 
Women's Suffrage in Dallas County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, October 11, 2020
1. Women's Suffrage in Dallas County Marker
Inscription.  

The first organized effort on behalf of women's suffrage in Texas occurred in May 1893, when the Texas Equal Rights Association (T.E.R.A.), later known as the League of Women Voters of Texas, was formed at a convention held at Dallas' Windsor Hotel. Of the forty-eight charter members of the organization, fourteen were Dallasites. In October of that year, T.E.R.A. leaders helped to organize the Texas Woman's Congress, which met at the State Fair in Dallas. During this period, a weekly suffrage column, entitled "Women in Public" was published in the Dallas Morning News. Suffrage advocates continued their work into the 20th century.

On March 13, 1913, forty-three Dallas women gathered to establish the Dallas Equal Suffrage Association (D.E.S.A.), which became the League of Women Voters of Dallas in October 1919. Many of the women had participated in previous suffrage organizations; younger members were eager to contribute to the cause. The group elected Margaret Bell Houston Kaufman, granddaughter of Sam Houston, as its first president. During World War I, D.E.S.A. officers served as leaders in local wartime organizations while
Women's Suffrage in Dallas County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, October 11, 2020
2. Women's Suffrage in Dallas County Marker
continuing to advocate the cause of women's suffrage. During the 1918 Texas Gubernatorial Campaign, members of D.E.S.A. procured signatures of over 10,000 Dallas County women on a petition backing a primary suffrage bill. The bill passed, enabling Texas women to vote in primary elections. Dallas County suffragists registered over 16,000 women to vote in the July 1918 primary election. The Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution allowed women to vote on August 26, 1920. This act was the culmination of years of struggle and effort put forth by the suffragists of Dallas County and the nation.
Marker is property of the State of Texas
 
Erected 2009 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 15814.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Civil RightsWomen.
 
Location. 32° 46.716′ N, 96° 48.42′ W. Marker is in Dallas, Texas, in Dallas County. Marker is on South Record Street just south of Main Street, on the right when traveling south. The marker is on the east side of the Old Red Courthouse facing South Record Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 S Houston St, Dallas TX 75202, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Old Red Courthouse (here, next to this marker); First Juries to Sit Women in Dallas County
Old Red Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, October 11, 2020
3. Old Red Courthouse
(a few steps from this marker); John F. Kennedy Memorial Plaza (within shouting distance of this marker); Dallas County Records Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Dealey Plaza (about 400 feet away); Dallas County (about 400 feet away); Kennedy Assassination Route (about 400 feet away); Log Cabin Pioneers of Dallas County (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dallas.
 
Old Red Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, October 11, 2020
4. Old Red Courthouse
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 14, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 13, 2020, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas. This page has been viewed 49 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 13, 2020, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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