Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Phelan in San Bernardino County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Camp Cajon Monument

Historic Site

 
 
Camp Cajon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, October 2, 2020
1. Camp Cajon Marker
Inscription.  Dedicated July 4, 2019 in commemoration of the original Camp Cajon Monument located about 300' north of this site, and dedicated July 4, 1919.
 
Erected 2019 by Native Sons of the Golden West, Arrowhead Parlor 110.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker monument is listed in these topic lists: Parks & Recreational AreasRoads & Vehicles. In addition, it is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West series list. A significant historical date for this entry is July 4, 2019.
 
Location. 34° 18.398′ N, 117° 28.022′ W. Marker is near Phelan, California, in San Bernardino County. Marker is on Wagon Train Road half a mile south of Highway 138, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3351 Wagon Train Rd, Phelan CA 92371, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Santa Fe and Salt Lake Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Stoddard-Waite Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mormon Pioneer Trail (approx. ¼ mile away); Blue Cut (approx. 2.8 miles away); Summit Train Station
Camp Cajon Marker and Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, October 2, 2020
2. Camp Cajon Marker and Monument
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(approx. 2.9 miles away); Elliot Ranch (approx. 2.9 miles away); Mormon Trail Monument (approx. 4.6 miles away); Lytle Creek Canyon (approx. 5.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Phelan.
 
Regarding Camp Cajon Monument. Camp Cajon was built on National Old Trails Road, which became U.S. Route 66 in 1926, and Camp Cajon became famous as “the gateway into Southern California.” It was the brainchild of William Bristol, a local orange grower, author, and poet. In 1917, Bristol attended the dedication of the Santa Fe and Salt Lake Trail monument that was built to honor the early settlers who traveled through the Cajon Pass. It was at this dedication that Bristol began to formulate his dream of building a picnic area where travelers could stop and rest in the Cajon Pass. Organizations like the Santa Fe Railroad, the Elks Club, and the Mission Inn in Riverside, built structures there. Camp Cajon was destroyed by the great flood of 1938, and the camp was abandoned. Route 66 was realigned, and Camp Cajon was nearly forgotten. Interstate 15 completely bypassed old Route 66 in 1970. In 2019, the new Camp Cajon monument was planned and constructed by the San Bernardino,
Camp Cajon Monument image. Click for full size.
By Charles Hepperle, September 15, 2019
3. Camp Cajon Monument
Wrightwood, Highland, and Mohahve Historical societies.
 
Camp Cajon Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, October 2, 2020
4. Camp Cajon Monument
Camp Cajon Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, October 2, 2020
5. Camp Cajon Monument
Original Camp Cajon Monument image. Click for full size.
6. Original Camp Cajon Monument
This photo is courtesy of Mark Landis.
Route 66 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, October 2, 2020
7. Route 66
The nearby hiking trail passes the bridge abutments of National Old Trails Road, which is also the old wagon road.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 10, 2020. This page has been viewed 80 times since then and 17 times this year. Last updated on October 16, 2020. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 10, 2020, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   3. submitted on September 16, 2019, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on October 10, 2020, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 9, 2021