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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Dayville in Grant County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Welcome to the John Day River

 
 
Welcome to the John Day River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 10, 2020
1. Welcome to the John Day River Marker
Map of the John Day River Drainage at the top right.
Inscription.  You are standing in the middle of a lively watershed. Supporting a diverse community of aquatic and terrestrial life, the John Day River is the longest free-flowing river west of the Rocky Mountains, flowing over 280 miles to its mouth at the Columbia River.
Made up of four branches, the John Day River Basin carries water out of the Blue Mountains, sustaining orchards and crops. livestock, and human communities. Plateau Indian fishing traditions are also intwined with the river, recalling a time the it was named the Hah-Hah.
Most of the John Day River has been designated a National Wild and Scenic River for its outstanding natural and cultural values.

Who Was John Day?
The river was named for a fur trapper from Virginia who sought opportunities in Oregon in the early 1800s. En route to Astoria, John Day and companion were confronted by American Indians at the mouth of the John Day River. Although the two were stripped of their possessions, including clothes, they still managed to reach help. Later, Oregon Trail travelers along the Columbia River would point out the site of the incident, thus re-naming the
Welcome to the John Day River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 10, 2020
2. Welcome to the John Day River Marker
river.

The River Trail
Beginning to your left, this 1/4 mile trail will take you to the banks of the John Day River. The trail has a gentle slope and is accessible to those in wheelchairs.
Several interpretive exhibits feature sights along the way. There is a picnic table under the shade of a tree at the end of the trail.

Established in 1975, John Day Fossil Beds National Monument is managed by the National Park Service for the benefit of the public.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureWaterways & Vessels.
 
Location. 44° 33.323′ N, 119° 38.675′ W. Marker is near Dayville, Oregon, in Grant County. Marker can be reached from Oregon Route 19 near U.S. 25, on the right when traveling north. This marker is located on the grounds of Cant Ranch. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 32651 Oregon Highway 19, Dayville OR 97825, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. James Cant Ranch Historic District (here, next to this marker in Montana); a different marker also named James Cant Ranch Historic District (within shouting distance of this marker in Montana); Haystacker (within shouting distance of this marker in Montana); On the Road of History
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(within shouting distance of this marker in Montana); Lifeblood of a Ranch (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line in Montana); Shearing the Sheep (about 300 feet away); Wool Bag Stand (about 300 feet away); An Oregon Fossil Rush (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dayville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 17, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 22 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 17, 2020, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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Oct. 27, 2020