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Athens in Limestone County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The United State Colored Troops

Fort Henderson and Trinity School

 
 
The United State Colored Troops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, October 18, 2020
1. The United State Colored Troops Marker
Inscription.  
"The fort...was one of the best works of the kind I ever saw.” — Lt. Henry March, 115th Ohio, USA

Here you can see all that remains of Fort Henderson, the southeast bastion. Envision standing here during construction. The walls were 18 feet high. The moat in front of the parapet was 12 feet wide. Just close your eyes and smell the freshly dug earth. Felled trees with sharpened branches, the Civil War equivalent of barbed wire, were placed in front of the fort. By the fall of 1864, Fort Henderson was primarily manned by United States Colored Troops (USCTS) from three regiments, the 106th, 110th and 111th. The 110th made up the bulk of the garrison, which was commanded by the regiment's colonel, Wallace Campbell. Many in the regiment were former slaves from Athens or Limestone County. Among them were Company I's Julius Redus and his brother, Samuel, along with a blacksmith, John Jackson. George Allen served in Company H, with Moses Peete, a father with seven children. Doctor Peete, who received his name because of a visit to the local doctor as an infant, enlisted in December 1863 as did John Roberts.

The United State Colored Troops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, October 18, 2020
2. The United State Colored Troops Marker
These men were fighting not only to restore the Union, but for their own freedom.

[Photo captions]
Top: After the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, the War Department created the Bureau for Colored Troops. The office was responsible for raising and equipping black regiments, including the 1st United States Colored Troops photographed here. The USCT regiments at Fort Henderson were recruited from North Alabama and West Tennessee. By the end of the war, about 179,000 African Americans served in the Union army. Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Bottom middle: This 1949 photograph depicts Trinity principal Judson King in the fort's moat. Courtesy of the Tennessee Valley Authority

Bottom right: This photo of two unidentified men is labeled in Trinity principal Louise H. Allyn's handwriting “Old slaves who built the fort.” Courtesy of Amistad Research Center, New Orleans
 
Erected 2020 by American Battlefield Trust & Paul Bryant Jr.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 34° 47.871′ N, 86° 58.788′ W. Marker is in Athens, Alabama, in Limestone County. Marker is on Trinity Circle north

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of Browns Ferry Street (County Road 29), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 606 Trinity Cir, Athens AL 35611, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Coleman Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battles of Fort Henderson and Sulphur Creek Trestle (within shouting distance of this marker); Trinity School (within shouting distance of this marker); Prisoners of War (within shouting distance of this marker); Reconstruction (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Henderson / Trinity School - 1865-1970 (within shouting distance of this marker); Coleman Family (approx. ¼ mile away); Governor George S. Houston Home (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Athens.
 
Also see . . .  From USCT Fort to African American School in Athens, Alabama. From the American Battlefield Trust website. (Submitted on October 19, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 19, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 19, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 53 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 19, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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Mar. 8, 2021