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Nashville in Davidson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Redoubt No. 4, Battle of Nashville

December 15, 1864

 
 
Redoubt No. 4, Battle of Nashville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, October 18, 2020
1. Redoubt No. 4, Battle of Nashville Marker
Inscription.  Redoubt No. 4 lies before you, one of the last surviving features of the Battle of Nashville.

In early December 1864, C.S.A. General John Bell Hood brought the 25,000-man Army ofTennessee to Nashville, hoping to liberate the city and move into Kentucky. On December 10, Hood ordered the construction of five redoubts (log and earth fortifications) near Hillsboro Pike to protect his flanks. A winter storm froze the ground, preventing the soldiers from completing Redoubt No. 4 when the opening attack came on December 15.

In this part of the battlefield, U.S. troops formed about 11 a.m. along the ridge approximately ½ mile to the west of Redoubt No. 4 (now Estes Road). Meanwhile over 24 U.S. cannons dueled with the redoubt's four cannons fired by the 48 artillerymen of Lumsden's Battery, supported by 148 men of the 24th Alabama Infantry. They were ordered to hold the position at all hazard. 7,000 U.S. infantry and dismounted cavalry troops, armed with Spencer repeating rifles, began an assault at 2:15 p.m. Also, the U.S. had captured Redoubt No. 5 to the south, and directed its cannon at Lumsden's position. The Alabama troops
Redoubt No. 4, Battle of Nashville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane and Tracy Marsteller, October 18, 2020
2. Redoubt No. 4, Battle of Nashville Marker
were overwhelmed around 3 p.m. and a number were captured. The U.S. forces then crossed Hillsboro Pike, attacking the C.S.A. troops sheltered behind the rock walls.

The Battle of Nashville continued until the late afternoon of December 16, when Hood's army was finally defeated by the 50,000 soldiers under U.S. General George Thomas. It was the last battle of importance in Tennessee. By the following April, the Confederate States of America was no more.
 
Erected by Tennessee Historical Society.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil.
 
Location. 36° 6.22′ N, 86° 49.569′ W. Marker is in Nashville, Tennessee, in Davidson County. Marker is on Foster Hill south of Abbottsford when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 802 Foster Hill, Nashville TN 37215, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Julia McClung Green (approx. 0.4 miles away); Battle of Nashville (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Nashville (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Harpeth Hall School (approx. ¾ mile away); Woodmont Estates (approx. ¾ mile away); a different marker also named Battle of Nashville (approx. one
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mile away); First Airfield (approx. one mile away); Natchez Trace (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Nashville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 19, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 19, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 45 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 19, 2020, by Duane Marsteller of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Jan. 28, 2021