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Chatham in Barnstable County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

U.S. Coast Guard Steel 44-Foot Motor Life Boat CG44301

 
 
U.S. Coast Guard Steel 44-Foot Motor Life Boat CG44301 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 4, 2020
1. U.S. Coast Guard Steel 44-Foot Motor Life Boat CG44301 Marker
Inscription.  
Specifications
Overall Length: 44ft. 1.5in.
Maximum Beam: 12ft. 8in.
Draft: 3ft. 6in.
Displacement: 39,500lbs.
Propulsion : Twin 185 horsepower diesel engines, with twin propellers and twin rudders
Maximum Speed: 14 knots
Operational Range: 215 Nautical Miles
Crew: 3 Minimum
Survivor Capacity: 21 Maximum
Maximum Seas: 30 feet in height
Maximum Winds: 50 knots in speed
Maximum Tow: 125 gross tons
Self-righting and Self- bailing

Design
Hull: Corten Steel 3/16 Inches thick
Compartments: Nine Watertight Compartments
Framing: Longitudinal and Transverse Frames Spaced 18-22 Inches apart

Boat History
Motor Lifeboat CG44301 was the first production series lifeboat of its type constructed by the Coast Guard’s shipyard in Curtis Bay, Maryland. CG44301 was completed on 7 January 1963 and assigned to Station Chatham. The 44-foot, steel-hulled motor lifeboat was designed and built to provide stations a more modern and capable replacement for the venerable 36-foot wooden-hulled
U.S. Coast Guard Steel 44-Foot Motor Life Boat CG44301 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 4, 2020
2. U.S. Coast Guard Steel 44-Foot Motor Life Boat CG44301 Marker
Behind the marker is the retired life boat CG44301.
motor lifeboat, with CG36500 being one of the most famous examples, having been used by BM1 Bernard C. Webber as coxswain to rescue 32 survivors off of the disabled tanker SS Pendleton off of Monomoy Island on 18 February 1952. BM1 Webber was later chosen to help evaluate the capabilities of the 44-foot lifeboat. CG44301 was assigned to Chatham from 25 March 1962 to 1971, and then from 2002 until 8 May 2009, when it was retired from active service. 44-foot motor lifeboats were also used by lifeboat services in Great Britain, Italy and Canada.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: DisastersWaterways & Vessels.
 
Location. 41° 40.295′ N, 69° 56.949′ W. Marker is in Chatham, Massachusetts, in Barnstable County. Marker is on Main Street south of Water Street, on the left when traveling north. Located next to the Coast Guard Station Chatham. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 37 Main Street, Chatham MA 02633, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. History of Chatham Lighthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Captain Mayo / Surfman Ellis (within shouting distance of this marker); The Mayflower Story (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Chatham Harbor (within shouting distance of this marker); Original Prop
Coast Guard Station Chatham image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, October 4, 2020
3. Coast Guard Station Chatham
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Rescue of the Pendleton (within shouting distance of this marker); Chatham Packet Wharf (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Godfrey Windmill (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chatham.
 
Also see . . .
1. Motor Life Boat CG44301 - Foundation for Coast Guard History. (Submitted on October 22, 2020, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida.)
2. First Coast Guard District. (Submitted on October 26, 2020, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 16, 2021. It was originally submitted on October 22, 2020, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 27 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 22, 2020, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Michael Herrick was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 2, 2021